Gui Boratto: Minimal is dead

Image for Gui Boratto: Minimal is dead

Although he started out his professional career as an architect, from fast rising Brazilian techno superstar Gui Boratto’s perspective his new direction as one of the scene’s most notable new producers is not really all that different to his previous life drawing up building plans. “Music and architecture are very much the same, they just express art in different ways,” Boratto remarked when talking to ITM on the eve of his first ever Australian tour. The Sao Paulo based studio boffin is also of the somewhat controversial opinion that minimal music ‘in its original form intended is dead,’ a rather contentious statement to make considering he’s been hailed as one of the scene’s saviours. That being said, when you make albums as universally appraised as Boratto’s 2007 debut ‘Chromophobia’ (released on German label Kompakt), you more or less earn yourself the right to claim whatever the hell you want… who are we to argue?

We’ve been hearing a lot about the South American dance music scene in recent years. How do you think the Brazilian scene, in particular, differs from the rest of the world?

It’s the weather, the food, the girls and the tropical and happy atmosphere that we have here. Some people say that Brazil is going to be the new Ibiza, especially the south of Brazil.

How do you think minimal techno has had its influence over club music in the past few years?

I think minimal, in its original form intended, is dead. In my opinion everywhere in Berlin you hear the same music. I think in a short time it will have a strong change. After all, everything changes constantly.

As well as being an ace music producer you are also an architect, which is interesting. Would you say there is a connection between your skills as an architect and your music? Would you describe the physical world as an influence on your music?

Of course, music and architecture are very much the same, they just express art in different ways. That being said, both work in ‘spaces’. Architecture had an incredible influence in my life, and it’s also influenced my music.

In ‘Chromophobia’ the songs almost carry colours of their own, some being darker while some are lighter and uplifting, like ‘Beautiful Life’; it seems a bit contradictory to the title. Is there story behind the title?

It was a little joke, really. It’s supposed to be ironic, as my music is everything but monochromatic. I’ve used the title ‘Chromophobia’ to express simplicity. The meaning of monochromatism is that there’s no hierarchy. I’ve tried to express the same feeling on the album.

Do you produce music with a defined intention, or do you let the music produce itself?

The music goes naturally on its way… I don’t think much when I produce. It grows on its own and asks me what it needs.

You’ve been with many respected labels, but in 2005 you went your own way with music production. What inspired the change?

I’d just decided to produce my own techno. It was back in 2003 when I did two remixes for the City Of God movie soundtrack. After that, I was more and more into my own productions.

Besides the music you produce, are there any other styles of music that tickle your fancy?

Rock of course. I came from rock & roll. That’s my real school.

You recently combined with UK duo Goldfrapp to create a remix of their new single A&E, what was it like working with them?

It’s nice to work with a big label like Mute/EMI, and it was also super cool to work on Goldfrapp. Alison has an incredible voice.

Soon you’ll be visiting Australia for the first time. What are you expecting from the Australian scene?

I don’t know much about the electronic scene in Australia, but I know people there are really up to date on techno. I’m also super excited to see how beautiful this country is.

What are you currently working on?

I’m doing some remixes and beginning to think about my new album, which will come out on Kompakt maybe in September. I need time to compose and produce!

Don’t miss Gui Boratto on his first ever tour of Australia this February:

Fri Feb 22 – Bar Soma, Brisbane
Sat Feb 23 – Chinese Laundry, Sydney
Sun Feb 24 – Elsewhere, Gold Coast
Fri Feb 29 – Queensbridge, Melbourne (w/ Sven Vath & Steve Bug)

Ahhhh, the wonders of YouTube… Check out this rather odd mash-up of Boratto’s track ‘The Rising Evil’ and Missy Elliot’s ‘Gossip Folks’:

Comments

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spice_of_life

spice_of_life said on the 11th Feb, 2008

contentious? haha sif. he's right! minimalism in its true form died ages ago. nobody makes repetitive loops and weird shit like steve reich used to, and modernised loopy techno isn't as popular as it once was. especially in australia!

locky

locky said on the 11th Feb, 2008

mininamist techno maybe old hat,but id rather listen to that than hear another dead horse called electro getting flogged again,and again ,and again. G

Sword22

Sword22 said on the 11th Feb, 2008

Minimal, in the sense of Booka Shade, was an amazing branch off of the way dance music was heading into a more grungy sound coming mainly from the likes of french acts like justice etc which could be described as trashy electro. I am a believer that with

Sword22

Sword22 said on the 11th Feb, 2008

i used to hate electro but it has so many different styles. everything is electronic anyway so how do u really define electro...

eat_chips

eat_chips said on the 12th Feb, 2008

Does anyone else see the contradiction in what he is saying? He states that minimal techno is dead, yet then also claims music can change. So really it's just moving. Why is it as soon as a style of begins to expand and evolve away from its roots do peop

Spekman

Spekman said on the 12th Feb, 2008

tech house all the way!!!