David Guetta: Mr. Incredible

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“He seems to have the ability to go nonstop 24/7, 365 days a year. If he is not in the studio, then he’s on a plane, in a car, at a gig or doing promo. His schedule is ridiculous. He is on the entire time.”

That’s US booking agent Paul Morris who recently spoke to US chart publication Billboard about the floppy haired Frenchman that’s likely been lining his coffers thicker than ever in the last three years – David Guetta. That the grinning Guetta is once again in spotlight of a magazine like Billboard – a space traditionally reserved for the pop elite that Guetta’s found himself keeping company with lately – is a testament to Morris’ summation of his client’s unfathomable work ethic which has seen the French house hitmaker go from a formidable club-filler to mainstream mega-star and frequent punching bag around these parts. Say what we might (and already have) about his rise to commercial crossover ubiquity, Guetta’s clawed his way to the top on the strength of his unshakable drive and punishing schedule that does indeed keep him on at all times, like when he dutifully answers my phone call for inthemix’s first David Guetta interview in several years, despite being in recovery mode from his 1AM headline set at Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas back in June. Aided by Berocca or not, it’s almost on instinct that Guetta immediately clicks into the right gear, a ragged croak in his voice the only giveaway that perhaps he is capable of having an off day.

“It was really crazy,” the Frenchman enthuses from the confines of his LA hotel room where he’s in the middle of an alotted press ‘block’ that’s been shifted twice at the last minute. “This is a festival with 100,000 people watching me in the middle of the desert in Vegas. That’s just crazy! When I tour by myself doing my David Guetta shows I get probably about 10,000 people and that is also crazy for me because I come from the clubs where getting 500 people through the door was our goal. It’s really unbelievable.”

Flanked by illuminated stilt-walking robots and towering LED screens compelling the throng of ravers to make ‘noise’ and to get ‘ready’, Guetta’s set at EDC was fittingly bombastic and looked like the ideal setting for Guetta to admire his dominion of freshly converted dance fans. After all, the in-roads being made by DJs and producers into the booming American EDM market are indebted to Guetta’s trailblazing efforts of the last few years, even if prying open that door gave us Will.i.Am. and his electro-fied Black Eyed Peas in return.

Comments

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danmau5

danmau5 said on the 17th Aug, 2011

I am beginning to wonder if he ever was the "underground" dj that i remember him being, or if it is just me who has changed. i listened to him ten years ago, but come to think, it would have been on a ministry of sound release. maybe i used to be this commercial without realising, and he is just being the same dude he always has been. something to think about... good article dave, interesting to see DG before and after.

GoodLove

GoodLove said on the 17th Aug, 2011

Those who say he has sold out wouldnt be saying that if their bank account was as fat as his.

Still a big wank though.

theHordern

theHordern said on the 17th Aug, 2011

proper synthetic meticulous answers. oh well, bless his cotton socks.

SlicyDicer

SlicyDicer said on the 17th Aug, 2011

To be fair his sets contain other things than the pop infused rubbish he puts out on radio

SlicyDicer

SlicyDicer said on the 17th Aug, 2011

ahaha I couldnt type that with a straight face

mlirosi

mlirosi said on the 17th Aug, 2011

@danmau5 really dont question your pas musical prowess, as much of as sell out guetta may be now he did drop things like distortion, little more love, up&away i can see why people would trash him now but in the early to mid 2000's what he did for the scene was nothing short of ground breaking

angy

angy said on the 17th Aug, 2011

Helping breaking dance music in the states is itself groundbreaking... the music that he makes now is what it is, it's pop music and it's probably more bearable than a lot of the stuff that stinks up the charts. And you can see a pretty big demand for more underground acts in the states now - who knows maybe some good will come of it ;)

mlirosi

mlirosi said on the 17th Aug, 2011

great article as well

Conor-

Conor- said on the 18th Aug, 2011

'...the house fans are quite honoured that these big pop artists are interested in their scene. It%u2019s cool.%u201D
Money talks mate. They'd rather not see pop acts there, but what can they do about it? They just shutup and enjoy some decent nightlife I guess.

DHindahouse

DHindahouse said on the 18th Aug, 2011

well he used to run and DJ at clubs in Paris. Maybe underground just meant not well known or not popular yet. Who knows what he played. It was probably wank.

blazet

blazet said on the 18th Aug, 2011

I dont think he used to be "quite so commercial". For example I really like his remix of Cassius from way back when:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amaaW1_z9fY

jamwildway

jamwildway said on the 18th Aug, 2011

Guetta is an awesome producer, dropping hits time after time. I cant remember when he produced a bad track!!!

SANDSHREW

SANDSHREW said on the 18th Aug, 2011

I SHAVED MY BALLS FOR THIS?

beyondandabove

beyondandabove said on the 19th Aug, 2011


mlirosi said yesterday morning
2@danmau5 really dont question your pas musical prowess, as much of as sell out guetta may be now he did drop things like distortion, little more love, up&away i can see why people would trash him now but in the early to mid 2000's what he did for the scene was nothing short of ground breaking
.

Couldn't agree more. I was just thinking that exact same thing whilst reading this article, which was superbly written as always Dave!

discotheque

discotheque said on the 19th Aug, 2011

angy, Guetta wasn't the first to break dance music into the mainstream. That distinction goes to Fatboy Slim in the late 90s for his crossover appeal. To this day, two of his biggest hits, Praise You and the Rockefeller Skank, are still played in a lot of rock stations over here in America. Fatboy Slim was the first DJ to pretty much cement himself into rock star status in 1998-1999. The fact that he was the first DJ to play the iconic Red Rocks Amphitheater with the Chemical Brothers in July 1999 would say something, wouldn't it?

Psychomaniac

Psychomaniac said on the 19th Aug, 2011

Mmmmm people bag him for "selling out" with pop colabs but man I fucking wish I was David Guetta haha. This clip says it all, dj's dream to be as big as this and play to 100,000 people.

angy

angy said on the 19th Aug, 2011


Fatboy Slim may have been the first to have a crossover hit, the first of many, but Guetta busted it into the pop/R&B mainstream in a way that's really taken hold and changed the face of "popular" music. Doesn't mean he was the first to be blurring the boundaries like that, or even that his music is any good, he's still a "trailblazer" whether you like him or not.

daverh

daverh said on the 19th Aug, 2011

^on the money. Fatboy definitely made huge moves into rock and MTV2 territory but that Guetta's got every big pop artist calling him and now Afrojack, SHM as a result speaks volumes about his work.

Slapppa

Slapppa said on the 19th Aug, 2011

USA is in its infacy of EDM...and like anything at the beginning, it's typically crap. Give US ten years to get up to speed. Guetta's just responding to the market

special ed

special ed said on the 19th Aug, 2011

the US isn't in its infancy, its had UK acts try and break into it for decades. Theres always been an EDM scene, just not in the commercial realm. Dont forget it was the US that invented house music, it just never broke into the mainstream. They are just 5 years behind the rest of Europe in terms of EDM breaking ground.
As much as I hate Guetta, I agree he has made monumental ground cracking the US mainstream, and despite it's commercial chees factor, its an important thing for EDM in the music mainstream

bonfiglio

bonfiglio said on the 20th Aug, 2011

Gawd, it's hilarious people still talk about him as though he has some agency. As a producer he's now beyond incidental; if not him, it would be someone else. He ain't dance no more. He's pop. He's a muppet. The business put him up there, give it a few years they'll take him down.

1 @ special ed re US dance music.

It's a vast and highly niched scene (...with talent deserving discussion more than Guetta, but that's another story...)

Weqster

Weqster said on the 21st Aug, 2011

I suppport David because he keeps Kanye out of the headlines. And you should to.

SlicyDicer

SlicyDicer said on the 22nd Aug, 2011

what you talkin' about slappa, the US has been at the forefront of electronic music for the last 30 years

Arnesjostedt

Arnesjostedt said on the 26th Aug, 2011

What do you think? Post your comment...

Arnesjostedt

Arnesjostedt said on the 26th Aug, 2011

Totally smashed that one. Nice one Dave.