The Music Studio

Hard Disk Bad Sectors for Musicians

Reply
  Tools
Fewsion +

Registered troll

Fewsion's Avatar
Joined
Oct '03
Times thanked
< 96
Posts
3,588
Hard Disk Bad Sectors for Musicians
Hard Disk Sentinel suggests I have 456 bad sectors on my hard drive, drive c:\ which windows is installed on. I keep all of my music /audio projects on d:\ which is running perfectly according to the same program.

Is this a serious issue, or has anyone had this problem before? Can hard drives be repaired in laptops?
hayden77 +

Registered User

Joined
Jun '12
Times thanked
< 1
Posts
6
You can use a number of programs to try to repair or recover data in the bad sectors (such as data lifeguard), however it will not resolve the problem permanently and will only get exponentially worse. My advice would be to safely recover all the data you need on your c:/ drive and transfer it to a new one you can replace it with. At least your d:\ drive should remain unaffected.
Dr Fegg +

Registered User

Dr Fegg's Avatar
Joined
Sep '01
Times thanked
< 5
Posts
301
Yes bad sectors can be a sign the drive is failing. If this is a laptop, it probably only has one physical hard drive (logically partitioned into two, so it looks like you have two drives c: and d: but in fact they are part of the same physical disk) - so it would be a VERY good idea to take a backup of all your D: drive files too, before it's too late.
Joe-Trojan +

distorted distortion

Joe-Trojan's Avatar
Joined
Jun '09
Times thanked
< 69
Posts
1,522
Back that shit up asap starting with the most important data.

On a related note, why do wav's and possibly other digital audio files deterioate over time on hard drives and is this a common thing? My music library on my PC consists of a shitload of tracks I ripped as wav's years ago direct from CD or from vinyl. More and more seem to have the ends chopped off or a glitch in the guts of the track. I used to use Western Digital enterprise hard drives for storage, now some Seagate, what gives?
Fewsion +

Registered troll

Fewsion's Avatar
Joined
Oct '03
Times thanked
< 96
Posts
3,588
Haven't noticed that to be honest Joe, but it sounds ordinary. Have organised my folders of rendered wavs to accompany project files as well so I can re-render if need be.

As I've never backed up my stuff, do I just copy c:\ to an external drive? Is that the simplest way and will it work?
jester_fu +

I ammmmmmmm

jester_fu's Avatar
Joined
Jul '03
Times thanked
< 200
Posts
3,990
You might want to back up the partition (d:\ for e.g.) you actually have your work/files on.

Windows doesn't like you copying "c:\" (or its' install partition) while its' running - so you'll get errors if you just try to copy C:\. You can either use a "ghosting" application to create an image of the c:\ drive or you need to figure out where you've been dumping your files and copy from there. Another alternative is to buy a new disk, install + format it and then copy the files from the failing HDD + keep it to the side. The sectors wont get very much worse if its' not being used.

Beside the risk of data loss, bad sectors will effect performance of the system as it tries to get data from the making it retry and slowing it down.
Fewsion +

Registered troll

Fewsion's Avatar
Joined
Oct '03
Times thanked
< 96
Posts
3,588
Thanks jester.

Would the purpose of copying c:\ be to retain installed programs and that sort of thing? I'd prefer just to copy D:\ then as I could start fresh and get rid of the junk that came pre-installed, or have unwittingly installed over the years.

If the hard drive is stuffed though what chance is there of fixing it in a laptop?
jester_fu +

I ammmmmmmm

jester_fu's Avatar
Joined
Jul '03
Times thanked
< 200
Posts
3,990
The way windows registers DLL's and changes registry settings, you can't just copy the programs to save them unless you know what you're doing and where the program has put everything + what needs to be registered. If your Windows image is reasonably fresh, just clone it using Norton Ghost (or equivalent - i think there's a couple of open source/free ones now) and restore it on the new disk. The ghost image should copy the data out of the bad sectors without corruption.

If the image isn't fresh, i'd start with a fresh Windows install and put your programs back on... then clone it if you feel the need.

Laptops use a 2.5" HDD - there's heaps of options. Your's is probably SATA which is even easier to get. Depending on the model of laptop, you usually just remove a few screws from the bottom and pop it out. Mac's are meant to be the 'hardest' but even on my MBP's you just unscrew the bottom case, remove the HDD carrier and slip off a cable. Google your laptop model and change hard drive... you should find some online tutorials if you're not comfortable going in yourself and nutting it out. Seriously - it's easier than changing RAM and worth having a crack at yourself. A new HDD will set you back < $100 even for like 750GB these days.
Fewsion +

Registered troll

Fewsion's Avatar
Joined
Oct '03
Times thanked
< 96
Posts
3,588
Sweet as. I will probably need the new hard drive and will do as you've suggested. No need to try to create the image file though, if the sole purpose is to clone installed programs then I don't need that and would prefer the fresh install. Just to clarify though, is a bad sector a hardware or software issue?
Heist9000 +

Life of Riley

Heist9000's Avatar
Joined
May '02
Times thanked
< 1,878
Posts
8,624
Are bad sectors like ghettos?
jester_fu +

I ammmmmmmm

jester_fu's Avatar
Joined
Jul '03
Times thanked
< 200
Posts
3,990
It's a hardware issue. There are ways to try and recover them but it can be risky and corrupt data beyond recovery. It's an absolute last resort - when you start getting bad sectors, the hard disk is failing and you should back up + toss it ASAP.
Fewsion +

Registered troll

Fewsion's Avatar
Joined
Oct '03
Times thanked
< 96
Posts
3,588

Quote:

Originally Posted by jester_fu View Post

It's a hardware issue. There are ways to try and recover them but it can be risky and corrupt data beyond recovery. It's an absolute last resort - when you start getting bad sectors, the hard disk is failing and you should back up + toss it ASAP.

Done and done, except for the throwing away part. Cheers for the help.
Reply

« Previous Thread Next Thread »

Posting Rules

+
    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts