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Richard Branson: "War on drugs a failure, decriminalise now"

View Poll Results: Is Cannabis a safe drug?
Yes. Legalise it 8 0.00%
Yes but don't legalise it 1 0.00%
In moderation 5 0.00%
Only when drinking beer 0 0%
Nope 2 0.00%
Not really. I got Schizophrenia 1 0.00%
should Dero13 not start threads 5000001 100.00%
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Richard Branson: "War on drugs a failure, decriminalise now"
http://www.smh.com.au/executive-styl...124-1qem4.html

Top bloke, cant believe it has to be someone like him to bring it up for world discussion.

Makes my blood boil that politicians are so stupid and ball less. When I read these type of articles I always think about getting into politics so I can try to bring some change myself haha..

Do you think that once our generation starts to fill the seats of parliament that things may begin to change..not just in drugs? Or are politicians always of the same scum breed..

P.S. Check out the comments and poll for de-criminalization. 80% for!
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Quote:

Originally Posted by sd88me View Post

Do you think that once our generation starts to fill the seats of parliament that things may begin to change..not just in drugs? Or are politicians always of the same scum breed..

This particular subject probably warrants some discussion. The problem is, I have associated with quite a few people "of our generation" and whilst the majority of them are fairly liberal and would support decriminalisation, there is the occasional mental dinosaur who still thinks DURKA DURR DRUGS ARE BAD MMMKAY and who still think that Global warming is a myth and heaps of other views which I thought were relgated to pissed off baby boomers.

I get the impression that there is a vast segment of society I don't associate with which harbours these people and their views. These are the people "of our generation" most likely to make it into politics imo, which means we are bang out of luck when it comes to sensible drug policy (or any other sensible policy).


I'm glad the subject is up for discussion again, but the fact is that it's up for discussion for the umpteenth time doesn't bring too much hope that anything will actually come of it (particularly in Australia)
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Originally Posted by Weinertron View Post

I get the impression that there is a vast segment of society I don't associate with which harbours these people and their views. These are the people "of our generation" most likely to make it into politics imo, which means we are bang out of luck when it comes to sensible drug policy (or any other sensible policy).

This. Those of us who support legalisation of drugs have taken too many drugs and had too many questionable photos of ourselves posted on Facebook to ever make it into politics.

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i agree with all of that.

however you would also be surprised how many people who were once complete drug riddled trash bags turn out to be very conservative as they get older and have kids.

as I've got older myself i probably think drugs are more dangerous than i once did. I'm all for decriminalising drugs, but i also think they can do a fair bit of harm. it's a complex issue and it's not helped by people on both sides taking an extreme position - i.e. drugs are harmless, or alternatively drug users should all be locked up.
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[quote=sd88me;394727904
Makes my blood boil that politicians are so stupid and ball less. [/QUOTE]

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Originally Posted by Nardo View Post

as I've got older myself i probably think drugs are more dangerous than i once did. I'm all for decriminalising drugs, but i also think they can do a fair bit of harm. it's a complex issue and it's not helped by people on both sides taking an extreme position - i.e. drugs are harmless, or alternatively drug users should all be locked up.

Yeah, while I still believe grass should be legalised, I'll be the first one to tell you it's sure as shit not harmless stuff.

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The music that I push in my opinion is probably a bit too mature for someone who listens to "Trance" but hey, we all have to start somewhere?

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Originally Posted by Nardo View Post

- i.e. drugs are harmless, or alternatively drug users should all be locked up.

But who actually says drugs are harmless? (apart from nutjobs like Bill O'Reilly when talking about hippies)

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breathing the city air is probably not completely harmless either
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it won't happen- it's political suicide. it will be but a pipe dream for the forseable future. Australia is very much socially, militarily and politically aligned with the USA where there is much to lose by decriminalising drugs. Police force budgets and privatised prisons depend pretty much entirely on the status quo-they will not just stand by and let that be messed with.
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It's a complicated issue. I've been a regular user in the past and have maintained a good career, friends, relationships etc without issue. But I know there are a lot of people who aren't able to do so and decriminalising drugs would potentially lead to an increase in people basically fucking themselves up.

Making drugs legal would lead to better quality and to essentially destroying the majority of organised crime but I worry about how bad it could get for society.

It would be nicer to say "ok you're able to handle drugs so go for it, and you're a fuckwit so you can't". But that's unworkable. As with everything, the minority fuck it up for the majority and thus we have blanket laws for all.

And of course following decriminalisation all you'd need was one death from drugs or drug-related shenanigans to fuck everything up.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by gonefishin View Post

it won't happen- it's political suicide. it will be but a pipe dream for the forseable future. Australia is very much socially, militarily and politically aligned with the USA where there is much to lose by decriminalising drugs. Police force budgets and privatised prisons depend pretty much entirely on the status quo-they will not just stand by and let that be messed with.

Agreed. But if there was more people speaking out about the issue and exposing the hard facts rather than hysterical right wing hyperbole it would certainly help.

I say use their 'War on Drugs' thing against them and liken it to a war where 'the good guys' are outnumbered by 'the bad guys' 100 to 1 in personnell, budget, arms and strategy.

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Originally Posted by Dubz View Post

It's a complicated issue. I've been a regular user in the past and have maintained a good career, friends, relationships etc without issue. But I know there are a lot of people who aren't able to do so and decriminalising drugs would potentially lead to an increase in people basically fucking themselves up.

Making drugs legal would lead to better quality and to essentially destroying the majority of organised crime but I worry about how bad it could get for society.

It would be nicer to say "ok you're able to handle drugs so go for it, and you're a fuckwit so you can't". But that's unworkable. As with everything, the minority fuck it up for the majority and thus we have blanket laws for all.

And of course following decriminalisation all you'd need was one death from drugs or drug-related shenanigans to fuck everything up.

You act as if them being illegal stops people taking them now.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sd88me View Post

http://www.smh.com.au/executive-styl...124-1qem4.html

Top bloke, cant believe it has to be someone like him to bring it up for world discussion.

Makes my blood boil that politicians are so stupid and ball less. When I read these type of articles I always think about getting into politics so I can try to bring some change myself haha..

Do you think that once our generation starts to fill the seats of parliament that things may begin to change..not just in drugs? Or are politicians always of the same scum breed..

P.S. Check out the comments and poll for de-criminalization. 80% for!

just out of curiosity, what is it about decriminalisation of drugs that appeals to you? Is it the ability for you to be able to get stoned or high at your convenience without any consequences?

I doubt that those in favour give a left nut about how much the war on 'drugs' costs society because those on the left spectrum of politics have never been worried about 'cost' when debating any political initiative.

I gather that it's more of a lifestyle thing for those that are in favour of decrminilasing. If so, then is that good grounds to decriminalise activities which can cause immense harm?
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Quote:

Originally Posted by big eddie View Post

You act as if them being illegal stops people taking them now.

This.

Also, from the study Branson mentioned, legalisation didn't lead to an increase in use. That makes sense, 'cause as I see it, you're either going to take drugs or you're not. Legalisation just makes it safer for the consumer.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MCSphinx View Post

This.

Also, from the study Branson mentioned, legalisation didn't lead to an increase in use. That makes sense, 'cause as I see it, you're either going to take drugs or you're not. Legalisation just makes it safer for the consumer.

I'm pretty sure the two EU countries with the most liberal drug laws (Netherlands and Portugal) also have the lowest rates of drug usage. Go figure.
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Originally Posted by buffed View Post

just out of curiosity, what is it about decriminalisation of drugs that appeals to you? Is it the ability for you to be able to get stoned or high at your convenience without any consequences?

I doubt that those in favour give a left nut about how much the war on 'drugs' costs society because those on the left spectrum of politics have never been worried about 'cost' when debating any political initiative.

I gather that it's more of a lifestyle thing for those that are in favour of decrminilasing. If so, then is that good grounds to decriminalise activities which can cause immense harm?

It doesn't impact me personally these days, but it is a no-brainer. Treating it as a criminal issue is: a) Extraordinarily expensive b) Incredibly ineffective

Australia has among the highest rates of cannabis and amphetamine usage in the world. 30 years of the drug war has had very little impact on the supply side, whereas after a decade of decriminalisation portugal has massively improved the health outcomes of drug users and reduced usage rates.

So lets be clear here. Criminialisation is more costly, that is the amount it costs is MORE than treating it as a health issue.

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decriminalising drugs doesn't mean they are readily available for any one to use, it makes acquiring the drug controlled and overseen. this helps to prevent some misuse and overuse.

methadone clinics and needle centres are the first example and have clearly proven to be beneficial.

what about alcohol? prohibition in the 20's and its effects? its immense problems still today, many of which include deaths and suicide...?

much to debate about.
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The main benefit i would see is an effective use of government resources as opposed to an extremely ineffective one which is derived from a purely idealistic policy imported from the USA. I also love the idea that shitsack drug dealers will have to get up each day and go to work the lazy greedy fucks
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Originally Posted by sd88me View Post

decriminalising drugs doesn't mean they are readily available for any one to use, it makes acquiring the drug controlled and overseen. this helps to prevent some misuse and overuse.

Actually that isn't true, that is regulation.

As far as decriminalisation goes, It's still illegal to sell/traffic drugs, but if you are caught with an amount classed as possession then you are not criminally prosecuted, they will still confiscate your drugs.

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Quote:

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just out of curiosity, what is it about decriminalisation of drugs that appeals to you? Is it the ability for you to be able to get stoned or high at your convenience without any consequences?

I doubt that those in favour give a left nut about how much the war on 'drugs' costs society because those on the left spectrum of politics have never been worried about 'cost' when debating any political initiative.

I gather that it's more of a lifestyle thing for those that are in favour of decrminilasing. If so, then is that good grounds to decriminalise activities which can cause immense harm?

A. This is a libertarian position.

B. It is the utmost hypocrisy for cigarettes and alcohol to be legal while other drugs are lilegal. Alcohol is a dangerous liquid drug. The catch all "drugs and alcohol" is a misnomer. You could just as easily say drugs and LSD.

C. Ever seen inside Long Bay Jail? Putting people in jail for drugs is harmful and ignorant totalitarianism.

D. So what if drug users have a vested interest? You have a vested interest in almost everything you post about. Your post does nothing more than trumpet your biases.

E. What is it about criminalisation of drug use that appeals to you? The wasted police and customs resources? The profit making violent drug cartels? The control of the individual? The unnecessary risk taking? Hep B? Hep C? Aids? The untaxed black market economy? The benefits to the alcohol industry? The lies adoldescents and young adults say to their parents? The bad pills that cause overdoses?
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Quote:

Originally Posted by big eddie View Post

So lets be clear here. Criminialisation is more costly, that is the amount it costs is MORE than treating it as a health issue.

Perhaps the criminilisation options are ineffective. Reading Superfreakonomics recently and they (in jest) suggest switching from prosecuting suppliers to buyers. That'd be interesting.

Anyhoo, it's interesting to watch this debate unfold on a dance-music webpage.
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Perhaps the criminilisation options are ineffective. Reading Superfreakonomics recently and they (in jest) suggest switching from prosecuting suppliers to buyers. That'd be interesting.

Or you could do it the NSW way, where they prosecute both. Covers all bases.
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Originally Posted by claude glass View Post

A. This is a libertarian position.

B. It is the utmost hypocrisy for cigarettes and alcohol to be legal while other drugs are lilegal. Alcohol is a dangerous liquid drug. The catch all "drugs and alcohol" is a misnomer. You could just as easily say drugs and LSD.

C. Ever seen inside Long Bay Jail? Putting people in jail for drugs is harmful and ignorant totalitarianism.

D. So what if drug users have a vested interest? You have a vested interest in almost everything you post about. Your post does nothing more than trumpet your biases.

E. What is it about criminalisation of drug use that appeals to you? The wasted police and customs resources? The profit making violent drug cartels? The control of the individual? The unnecessary risk taking? Hep B? Hep C? Aids? The untaxed black market economy? The benefits to the alcohol industry? The lies adoldescents and young adults say to their parents? The bad pills that cause overdoses?

B. i disagree on your contention that alcohol is as dangerous. I don't know of too many peope who have sat down and drunk themselves to death in the course of one drinking session.

C. I don't know of too many people who would be in long bay jail for personal use, other than if they are a serial offender

D. I'm interested in what his motivation is

E. I don't like the idea of making drugs easier to buy and making it socially more acceptable. For the same reasons that smoking and binge drinking are not socially acceptable and not in the best interests of the community.
As far as users go, if you take the risk, then badluck.......no different to any other substance that's harmful for you. Just because smoking and alcohol are legal, should we add to the problems that those already cause by making drugs legal too? Isn't it defeating your own argument by using cigarettes and alcohol as a justification for decriminilising drug use.......on theone hand you say that decriminalising drug use will make it safer and on the other you point to the problems that alcohol an cigarette addiction create and they are legalised.
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methadone clinics and needle centres are the first example and have clearly proven to be beneficial.

.

i'm yet to see any evidence that his has worked in NSW
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Quote:

Originally Posted by big eddie View Post

It doesn't impact me personally these days, but it is a no-brainer. Treating it as a criminal issue is: a) Extraordinarily expensive b) Incredibly ineffective

Australia has among the highest rates of cannabis and amphetamine usage in the world. 30 years of the drug war has had very little impact on the supply side, whereas after a decade of decriminalisation portugal has massively improved the health outcomes of drug users and reduced usage rates.

So lets be clear here. Criminialisation is more costly, that is the amount it costs is MORE than treating it as a health issue.

My name is Geezah, and I approve of this message.

---

Honestly; I stopped doing drugs because there comes a time when the downside far outweighs the upside, mentally and physically. The cumulative affects of age, changing ambitions, career-focus, serious relationship, and possibly kids and a mortgage, lead to a natural attrition rate for the large majority of drug users.

Prohibition fails economically, juridically, and healthwise. It never effects supply. It never effects demand. Legalise it, regulate it, tax it.
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My name is Geezah, and I approve this message.

---

Honestly; I stopped doing drugs because there comes a time when the downside far outweighs the upside, mentally and physically. The cumulative affects of age, changing ambitions, career-focus, serious relationship, and possibly kids and a mortgage, lead to a natural attrition rate for the large majority of drug users.

Prohibition fails economically, juridically, and healthwise. It never effects supply. It never effects demand. Legalise it, regulate it, tax it.

of course it affects demand. to say it doesn't is stupidity
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i'm yet to see any evidence that his has worked in NSW

Falling infection rates of blood-borne diseases among injecting drug users bare that out pretty easily.

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Originally Posted by buffed View Post

of course it affects demand. to say it doesn't is stupidity

So much that we have more or less the highest usage rate of illicit amphetamines in the western world?

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of course it affects demand. to say it doesn't is stupidity

What? It almost never effects demand e.g. prohibition of alcohol in America did nothing to curb demand. If it did, they'd still have prohibition of alcohol.
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Marijuana is the elephant in the room which needs to change. It will eventually be the first step. I don't know whether to laugh or cry watching footage of Aussie cops hunting down a plant in the bush. Chopper, 4wds, loads of dudes... a massive amount of resources which could be far better used.
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Isn't it defeating your own argument by using cigarettes and alcohol as a justification for decriminilising drug use.......on theone hand you say that decriminalising drug use will make it safer and on the other you point to the problems that alcohol an cigarette addiction create and they are legalised.

That's a very astute point. That's a definite complexity of the decriminalise drugs argument.
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i'm yet to see any evidence that his has worked in NSW

http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/resourc.../msic_kpmg.pdf

"This evaluation builds on a number of previous independent evaluations and analyses
commissioned by the NSW Government since the Trial began, which have concluded
that the MSIC positively impacts on clients, has a high level of support from local
residents and businesses, has not been shown to cause an increase in local crime or
drug use and saves at least $658,000 per annum over providing similar health
outcomes through other means in the health system"
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Originally Posted by gonefishin View Post

The main benefit i would see is an effective use of government resources as opposed to an extremely ineffective one which is derived from a purely idealistic policy imported from the USA.

It was Reagan more than any other President that ramped up the “War of Drugs” which then influenced drug policy of other nations, like Australia. He used the public shock over the cocaine overdose of Len Bias (1986 No.1 NBA draft pick) to drive through congress some pretty extreme illicit drug legislation.
Come with us back to those inglorious days when heroes weren't zeros. Before fair was square. When the cavalry came straight away and all-American men were like Hemingway to the days of the wondrous B movie. Gil Scott-Heron
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B. i disagree on your contention that alcohol is as dangerous. I don't know of too many peope who have sat down and drunk themselves to death in the course of one drinking session.

C. I don't know of too many people who would be in long bay jail for personal use, other than if they are a serial offender

D. I'm interested in what his motivation is

E. I don't like the idea of making drugs easier to buy and making it socially more acceptable. For the same reasons that smoking and binge drinking are not socially acceptable and not in the best interests of the community.
As far as users go, if you take the risk, then badluck.......no different to any other substance that's harmful for you. Just because smoking and alcohol are legal, should we add to the problems that those already cause by making drugs legal too? Isn't it defeating your own argument by using cigarettes and alcohol as a justification for decriminilising drug use.......on theone hand you say that decriminalising drug use will make it safer and on the other you point to the problems that alcohol an cigarette addiction create and they are legalised.


I disagree

B) thatsa very simple if not childish argument, it's pretty widely accepted that alchohol is responsible for many many deaths either due to disease or reckless actions whilst drunk.
C) So you're saying there are no junkies at Long Bay, ok then- I'll take your word for it lol
E)Binge drinking is so socially acceptable in australia that it is practically a national past time. Anyway, the discussion is not about making drug use "socially acceptable", it is about "decriminalisation" they are two completely different things.
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Originally Posted by walkdogz View Post

Marijuana is the elephant in the room which needs to change. It will eventually be the first step. I don't know whether to laugh or cry watching footage of Aussie cops hunting down a plant in the bush. Chopper, 4wds, loads of dudes... a massive amount of resources which could be far better used.

I see natural Marijuana as pretty benign for most people, but hydroponic and other high potency pot certainly is not. Bang for your buck, it kicks most other drugs arses.
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It's not benign at all, but it's not like it's current illegality stops anyone doing it.

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There was a doco done about it recently, they interviewed a guy who had worked in maximum security prisons systems for a majority of his life, he pretty much said that even in places like that there are people who manage to get drugs in. Basically, he was saying if you can't control it in a maximum security prison, how are you going to control it in a free society?

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Originally Posted by Geezah View Post

What? It almost never effects demand e.g. prohibition of alcohol in America did nothing to curb demand. If it did, they'd still have prohibition of alcohol.

are you really trying to tell me that making drugs easier to purchase will not stimulate far more demand? I know of plenty of friends that would buy stuff every week if they could, the only thing stopping them is having to go through the process of calling someone they don't know and then waiting on a street corner for the drug dealer to turn up and jump in their car to do a deal. Demand and use will multiply and that is something that i don't think society wants. That's the point, keeping it illegal won't stop people from doing it and i don't think that's the aim of the war on drugs and i can't remember anyone ever saying that the war on drugs would ever eradicate the supply and use, but it certainly makes it far more difficult for use and demand to increase
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I'd say the natural stuff is fairly benign as compared to hydro. Like beer vs moonshine.
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Originally Posted by big eddie View Post

It's not benign at all, but it's not like it's current illegality stops anyone doing it.

My point is that I don't see it as a special case. Its advocates though push the benign angle in order to make it a special case for decriminalisation, which is bogus.
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Originally Posted by buffed View Post

are you really trying to tell me that making drugs easier to purchase will not stimulate far more demand? I know of plenty of friends that would buy stuff every week if they could, the only thing stopping them is having to go through the process of calling someone they don't know and then waiting on a street corner for the drug dealer to turn up and jump in their car to do a deal. Demand and use will multiply and that is something that i don't think society wants

Except that isn't borne out by the data. We don't have to rely on supposition anymore. We can see what has happened over the course of a decade in a western nation (Portugal) and your theory is at odds with what actually happened.

I'll just say this again, Australia's rates of illicit drug use are among the highest in the world. That means that the deterrent effect of their current criminal status is minimal.

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Originally Posted by gravyishot View Post

I'd say the natural stuff is fairly benign as compared to hydro. Like beer vs moonshine.

I agree. It’s the moonshine variety though that most people in Australia use, and thus far from the harmless stuff baby boomers remember from the 60s and 70s.
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Originally Posted by buffed View Post

B. i disagree on your contention that alcohol is as dangerous. I don't know of too many peope who have sat down and drunk themselves to death in the course of one drinking session.

C. I don't know of too many people who would be in long bay jail for personal use, other than if they are a serial offender

D. I'm interested in what his motivation is

E. I don't like the idea of making drugs easier to buy and making it socially more acceptable. For the same reasons that smoking and binge drinking are not socially acceptable and not in the best interests of the community.
As far as users go, if you take the risk, then badluck.......no different to any other substance that's harmful for you. Just because smoking and alcohol are legal, should we add to the problems that those already cause by making drugs legal too? Isn't it defeating your own argument by using cigarettes and alcohol as a justification for decriminilising drug use.......on theone hand you say that decriminalising drug use will make it safer and on the other you point to the problems that alcohol an cigarette addiction create and they are legalised.

Legalising drugs doesn't mean Australia's saying "drugs are great - get into them". It's just being realistic that in the 50 years or whatever that drugs have been illegal - our use has increased!! We inject more money into policing it - the use has still increased! Something like 80% of people surveyed said access is not an issue. So in fact, by legalising it, there won't be a mass increase in users because people don't cite access as being a barrier anyway. Legalising means it takes profits away from the criminal organisations, takes people out of jails who don't belong there, provides consistent quality drugs which are better for people's health, and also provides an avenue for people who are seeking ways of quitting drugs to access counselling and rehabilitation programs.


if you look at how this has played out in Holland. They've legalised marijuana - and drug use has decreased. The use of harder drugs like speed and meth has also decreased.

Public health experts expect that if it was legalised, there would be an initial spike where people do it "because they can" or to try it, but that the use won't actually increase to rates that it otherwise is.

This topic gets me so fired up because everybody knows what is needed. But nobody has the balls to do it because it won't be popular.
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Originally Posted by buffed View Post

are you really trying to tell me that making drugs easier to purchase will not stimulate far more demand? I know of plenty of friends that would buy stuff every week if they could, the only thing stopping them is having to go through the process of calling someone they don't know and then waiting on a street corner for the drug dealer to turn up and jump in their car to do a deal. Demand and use will multiply and that is something that i don't think society wants. That's the point, keeping it illegal won't stop people from doing it and i don't think that's the aim of the war on drugs and i can't remember anyone ever saying that the war on drugs would ever eradicate the supply and use, but it certainly makes it far more difficult for use and demand to increase

you need to do some research mate. this is what everyone thinks will happen. but it doesn't! people don't have an issue getting drugs! they're easy. it won't cause a mass increase in use - and it hasn't in other countries where they've legalised drugs.
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Originally Posted by Dr Bones View Post

There was a doco done about it recently, they interviewed a guy who had worked in maximum security prisons systems for a majority of his life, he pretty much said that even in places like that there are people who manage to get drugs in. Basically, he was saying if you can't control it in a maximum security prison, how are you going to control it in a free society?

I work in health research. We did work in prison populations looking at the rates of injecting drug users. drugs are very readily available in prison, to the point that some prisoners will enter prison having never had drugs, and will leave as drug addicts.



love the tweets below the article:
"Ppl r not in their right mind whether it be cocaine marijuana etc Imagine someone dies from someone high legaly. They won't get charged"

someone who has died... won't get charged for drug use? the horror!!

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Originally Posted by mischa21 View Post

This topic gets me so fired up because everybody knows what is needed. But nobody has the balls to do it because it won't be popular.

All things being equal I don’t think it would be so unpopular. However, the issue would be hijacked by a small and noisy minority that would run scare campaigns to quash it. Conservative media outlets would also I’d imagine champion the scare campaign cause…….which in this country time and time again have proven very successful.
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Originally Posted by trist View Post

I agree. It’s the moonshine variety though that most people in Australia use, and thus far from the harmless stuff baby boomers remember from the 60s and 70s.

Yeah, and I think it's why a lot of the research on use is skewed these days. If all people drank was heavy distilled spirits we'd have a Gin Lane problem on our hands.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by buffed View Post

are you really trying to tell me that making drugs easier to purchase will not stimulate far more demand? I know of plenty of friends that would buy stuff every week if they could, the only thing stopping them is having to go through the process of calling someone they don't know and then waiting on a street corner for the drug dealer to turn up and jump in their car to do a deal. Demand and use will multiply and that is something that i don't think society wants. That's the point, keeping it illegal won't stop people from doing it and i don't think that's the aim of the war on drugs and i can't remember anyone ever saying that the war on drugs would ever eradicate the supply and use, but it certainly makes it far more difficult for use and demand to increase

Buffed, it is a well known fact that during Prohibition alcohol consumption in America *went up* ... as did homicides and organized crime

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Quote:

Originally Posted by buffed View Post

are you really trying to tell me that making drugs easier to purchase will not stimulate far more demand? I know of plenty of friends that would buy stuff every week if they could, the only thing stopping them is having to go through the process of calling someone they don't know and then waiting on a street corner for the drug dealer to turn up and jump in their car to do a deal. Demand and use will multiply and that is something that i don't think society wants. That's the point, keeping it illegal won't stop people from doing it and i don't think that's the aim of the war on drugs and i can't remember anyone ever saying that the war on drugs would ever eradicate the supply and use, but it certainly makes it far more difficult for use and demand to increase

FMD buffed. Do some reading before commenting.

You might want to google "portugal drug decriminalisation", you might find the total opposite has occurred.

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It's not perfect, but the policy has done the opposite of what most conservatives thought would happen.

I've been to Portugal many times before and after 2001, believe me it's changed for the better. Drug use was rampant in the streets of Lisbon, as a kid I even noticed it.

Last edited by Portal: 25-Jan-12 at 09:37am

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