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The New York City House Renaissance (A story of Underground Quality)

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The New York City House Renaissance (A story of Underground Quality)
Quoted throughout the opening of this thread will be the an RA feature that tied all of this together enough to warrant starting a new thread. Each of the artists alone (other than Jus-Ed) are relatively new to the scene and just starting to make a waves in the international House and Techno scenes.

Put simply the artists featured, Jus-Ed, Levon Vincent, Anthony Parasole, Fred-P and DJ QU are producers and DJs that are truely worthy of the international acclaim that awaits them. Although this thread is technically house themed there is no doubt that it will be best appreciated in this forum because the UQ sound resonates with the direction tha cetain techno has been taking over the last few years. In particular, followers of Berghain will have noticed the names listed above frequenting the playlists and charts of the Berghainers. Not to mention the fact that the House forum (and by implication, genre) strikes me as a little misunderstood and underutilised.




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The NYC House Renaissance

New York City house music was stuck in a rut in the early '00s, but a new batch of producers centered around Jus-Ed's Underground Quality label have recently emerged, and pushed it into a new era. This is their story.

For all its talk of the future, dance music has a decidedly classicist bent. Some of the best music currently being released is unabashedly backward-looking, whether it be in the purist strains of Berghain techno, nu-disco's Balearic fixations or house music's deep resurgence. The latter is being pushed by artists around the world, but few are doing it with the same sort of vitality—and coherence—as a group of New York-based and -influenced artists centered around Jus-Ed's Underground Quality label. Some are calling it a New York house renaissance, and based on the incredible music and parties that have been emerging from the likes of Ed, Levon Vincent, Black Jazz Consortium, DJ Qu and Anthony Parasole, it's hard not to see that something is happening there. And that 2009 may be its tipping point.

To call it a New York house renaissance, though, is slightly misleading. New York is a big place. But of the five artists largely responsible for this sound, only two actually live there. Parasole, who co-helms the Deconstruct imprint and co-runs the House-N-Home party, is in Brooklyn. While Black Jazz Consortium, AKA Fred P, is based in Queens. DJ Qu (New Jersey), Jus-Ed (Connecticut) and Levon Vincent (Indiana) each have strong ties to the city, though. Record stores, record distributors and parties in New York have all left an indelible mark on each.

The story of how this group came together revolves around a record shop called Halcyon. Set—at that time—in Brooklyn's Carroll Gardens neighborhood, the store, which doubled as a cafe, was among the finest that the city had to offer. As Jus-Ed remembers it, "You had to fill out an application to play [an in-store show] there. There were a lot of big-name DJs that wanted to play there that never did. I was lucky to be with Vic Money, the big dog at 98.7 KISS FM, and we still got the shit night. Mondays from 6 - 9 PM." Levon Vincent, an employee at the time, quickly grew to love the slot, though, warning off any fellow co-workers from taking that shift so that he could listen to Ed's sets each week.

Parasole also worked at Halcyon later on, and eventually became a buyer, purchasing some of the first records that DJ Qu released to stock in the shop. Vinyl that Ed had championed to New York distributor Downtown. And Fred P? The producer did a remix for Ed's wife, Jenifa Mayanja, on an Underground Quality EP of a song called "Time Waits For No-One" that piqued Ed's interest. In talking with Fred about his experiences in the industry, they immediately realized they shared common struggles, as well as similar sounds.

That sound, despite being house-based, though, is hard to pin down. The music that is being released by Levon Vincent and Anthony Parasole's labels has a toughness to it that is finding fans in the techno community. DJ Qu's tunes appeal to the old-school house heads. Fred P, meanwhile, is charting a course towards a deep house that is equal parts darkness and light, simple and complex. And Jus-Ed simply mixes it all together seamlessly, making it all sound like one big canvas upon which these artists are painting.

http://www.undergroundquality.com/home.htm

http://www.myspace.com/undergroundquality

http://www.myspace.com/deconstructmusic

Last edited by carramrod: 22-Aug-09 at 12:00am

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Jus-Ed


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Jus-Ed is the Godfather. The central figure in the New York house renaissance, his label Underground Quality and weekly radio show on myhouse-yourhouse.net are the first port of calls for anyone interested in learning more about the artists talked about here. Ed never asked to be the mentor to these artists, but due to his gregarious nature and his record business experience, he's given plenty of advice to Parasole, Vincent, Qu and P in their efforts to launch their own labels. And, crucially, plenty of advice on how to represent themselves, and Underground Quality, at gigs.

"The one that I impress upon the guys is professionalism. I tell them, 'How you are received, is how we are perceived.' You want to keep the door open for the next person, whoever that may be. When Fabric came calling the first time, I said, 'Finally! This is my Shelter moment!' Now I have to make a good impression, because I know these people are taking a risk creatively having me here. It's been a while since they've had this type of character. And they're not even clear on who this character is! But I went over there with Qu, and we played together and we kicked ass. They had to throw us out of the room. They had to tell the boss, Judy, who was in there jamming to shut us down. Normally they close it at 5:30, but that night we had it open until 6:30. The next time, we were there until 8!"

Ed's tireless work ethic only comes into focus, though, once you realize that despite his gigs around the world, he still maintains a full-time job back in Connecticut. Our conversation is peppered with quick phone interruptions about perennial flowers and tax talk, as Ed graciously relates the history of how he met each member of Underground Qualityeven the ones not affiliated with New Yorkin painstaking detail. It's clear that he revels, to a certain degree, in multi-tasking. Or that he's simply become accustomed to it. Needless to say, however, his joy for DJing has never dimmed. "If I could get enough money to pay for my kids to go to college, I'd do every gig for free," he tells me before breaking into his trademark laugh.

http://www.myspace.com/djjused



Quote:

Recorded live at The Bunker in Brooklyn on December 19, 2008. DJ Jus-Ed, head graced us with a brilliant 5 hour set on the first miserable snowy night of the winter. Here it is (in two parts) for so many of you who were stuck at home. You can read more about him here.

The Bunker Podcast 43: DJ Jus-Ed @ The Bunker, 14.09.2009 (Part001 & Part002), 15.01.2009





RA Podcast 127 feat. Jus-Ed, 3.11.2008

Quote:

Tracklist:
01. The Rhythm Slaves Life Music Pt. 2 ?ndo Music
02. AntonZap Do It Underground Quality
03. Jus-Ed The Wind Up Underground Quality
04. Wouldbenice One Cell Vidab
05. Lerosa Triage Quintessentials
06. Slowhouse Three A2 Slowhouse Recordings
07. Ibex Spiritual War Third Ear
08. AntonZap Basement Groover Quintessentials
09. Benjamin Brunn S?dvorstadt United States Of Mars
10. Mike Huckaby Wavetable No.9 S Y N T H
11. Lawrence Miles Dial
12. Levon Vincent These Games Novel Sounds
13. Jus-Ed Some New Shit Dub Underground Quality
14. David Alvarado Aurora Rated X Records

Last edited by carramrod: 21-Aug-09 at 11:37pm

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Levon Vincent


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Levon Vincent is the survivor. Each of the artists featured here have gone through a lot, but anyone that has met Vincent at his increasing slate of international DJ gigs knows that he's had to endure a lot in the past few years. Vincent walks with a cane, the result of a back injury sustained in New York. It's one of the reasons that he decamped to Indiana early in 2009 to focus his energies on music, after the usual run of odd jobs that never amounted to much in the way of health insurance. The injury, as Vincent will admit, though, was a blessing in disguise. Without any distractions in Indiana, he's produced the best work of his career, releasing track after track that bridges the gaps between house, dub and techno in a novel way.

Releasing on his own imprint, Novel Sound, and a label that he co-runs with Anthony Parasole called Deconstruct, he's seen his star rise over the past six months to a level that he likely never would have predicted when he was working at Halcyon, making sandwiches and working the register. Vincent, like the others, has had a long history in New York, but perhaps the most formative experience was working at designer Pat Fields' shop in the mid-'90s. It was there that he saw many of the wild characters that made up the local dance scene up close and personal. He was even booked to play The Limelight for the first time the night that notorious club owner Peter Gatien was hauled off to jail on federal drug charges.

It was seemingly an apt metaphor for Vincent's work up to that point: While he made initial forays into the club world, it was only years later that he was able to truly find his own niche, taking the musical lessons he learned when studying at the State University of New York and applying them to the wisdom taken from watching Jus-Ed and others work the floor. As Vincent put it in a recent interview with Bodytonic, "I am a scientist working in the field of ass-shakery."

http://www.myspace.com/levonvincent



RA Podcast 158 feat. Levon Vincent, 8.06.2009

Quote:

Tracklist:

01. Levon Vincent - Games Dub - Underground Quality
02. Steve Tang - Lowjack - Emphasis
03. Levon Vincent - Six Figures - Novel Sound
04. Housemaster Baldwin Feat. Paris Grey - Don't Lead Me (Medusa Mix) - Future Sound
05. M Pittman - Chicago Nights - Unirhythm
06. Bruce Ivery - B1 - Stilove4music
07. JC Freaks - Source - Wandering
08. Marcel Dettmann - Let's Do It - MDR
09. DJ Qu - Party People Clap They Hands (Levon Vincent RMX) - Deconstruct
10. House of Gypsies - Sume Sigh - Freeze
11. Levon Vincent - WKO - Unreleased
12. Pleasure Dome - 12 Min To Do It (DJ Pierre's Wild Pitch Mix) - Power Music
13. Round One feat. Andy Caine - I'm Your Brother (Prescription mix) - Main Street
14. Jus-Ed - Don't Stop The Da Dah Da! - Underground Quality

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Last edited by carramrod: 21-Aug-09 at 11:54pm

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Anthony Parasole


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Anthony Parasole is the party maker. His major contribution thus far to the New York house renaissance is via his DJing and his crucial House-N-Home loft party, an event done with The Bunker's mastermind Bryan Kasenic. Coming up on its first anniversary, the loft party has hosted the likes of Patrice Scott, Keith Worthy, Dixon, Mike Huckaby, Move D and more to the 12 Turn 13 space in Brooklyn. But just as it has showcased international and domestic talent, it's also served as an unofficial UQ residency, giving space to Vincent, Fred P, DJ Qu, Ed and of course Parasole on a regular basis to push their sound at an ideal location.

Unlike many of the other excellent parties that UQ-affiliated artists play at, such as the Tuesday deep house soiree Deep See, DJ Qu's aforementioned House Dance Conference or the outdoor summer series Sunday Best, it's one of the few that brings together disparate crowdsold-school house heads ready to dance, The Bunker's techno-loving crowd in search of a house alternative, those simply looking for a good loft party. Parasole often opens or closes the night, breaking out a mix of classics and future classics that you'll have rarely heard before. His recent mix for mnml ssgs is as good example as any of his talents.

After many years of being ensconced into the New York scene, it's clear that Parasole is finally reaping some of the benefits of his hard work as a DJ. The reason that you haven't heard much out of Parasole in the production arena? Like Ed, he has a full-time job, which occupies a great deal of his time. But he's also resistant, like many of the UQ-affiliated artists, to delve too deeply into new technologies. (That's also a major reason why Deconstruct, his label with Vincent, is still an entirely vinyl affair thus far.) He's set to release his first remix, an effort done with Fred P, on the next Deconstruct.

http://www.myspace.com/ill_house_you



Quote:

This set from Anthony Parasole was recorded live at House-N-Home in Brooklyn on January 17, 2009. It was his birthday and he was opening for Move D. He is co-owner of the white-hot Deconstruct label. You can read more about them here.

The Bunker Podcast 45: Anthony Parasole @ House-N-Home (17.01.2009), 5.02.2009


mnml ssgs mx32: Anthony Parasole presents 'steeple chase park' mix, Wednesday July 15 2009



Quote:

Tracklist:

01. Fred P - Mind in Flight "unreleased coming out soon"(Soul People Music)
02. Dj Qu & David S- Fight From Beyond (Strength)
03. Solab - Distant Galaxy (Lifeworld)
04. Dj Joey Anderson - Thee Analysis (Exchange Place)
05. Metro Area - Rhythm Reel (Environ)
06. Zachary Lubin- Introduction to algorithms (Axis Records)
07. Omar S - Track #8 (Fxhe)
08. Dj Qu - Air's Force (Semesters)
09. Morphosis- Anat (Morphine)
10. Obsolete Music Technology- Lowjack (Emphasis)
11. The Oliverwho Factory- U Don't Know (Madd Chaise)
12. Samuli Kemppi- Avaruusraita (Pakkas)
13. Levon Vincent- Games Dub (Underground Quality)
14. James Kumo- Fluid (Delsin)
15. Intrinsic- Tachyon (Emphasis)
16. Claude Vonstroke- Storm on Lake Saint Claire (dirtybird)
17. Jackmaster Corky- Dimension 106 (Creme Jak)
18. Dead Prez - It's Bigger Then Hip Hop (Loud)

Mirror: sendspace

Last edited by carramrod: 21-Aug-09 at 11:55pm

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Fred P (Black Jazz Consortium)


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Fred P is the quiet genius. Humble is the word that was uttered over and over to me when I asked the other artists about Fred Peterkin, and you can hear it quite clearly in his music. Recording under the Black Jazz Consortium moniker—"It was originally called Brooklyn Jazz Consortium. But then I moved," he laughs—Peterkin has carved a niche for himself in the deep house community. But, as Philip Sherburne noted in a recent column for Pitchfork, Peterkin stands above many classicists. He points to the sneaky complexity to his rhythms that contrast the simple and beautiful sentiments contained within the keys that he often plays over top. In listening to his latest album, Structure, or one of his best singles preceding it, "God's Promise," it's hard not to agree.

Structure almost never materialized, though, as Peterkin had given up music completely in the mid-'90s in favor of a full-time job. It was only a good friend bringing him mixtapes with music from the likes of 4 Hero and Spacetime Continuum that got him back into production again. Inspiration only went so far: "[When I started producing again] I couldn't get arrested in this town. 'Too this, too that, could you make it this way, could you make it that way.' The music I was making wasn't right for that time period though. It was too raw. Everything back then had a finished, glossy, beautiful kind of feel to it. And I was living in a room filled with cigarette butts, y'know?"

Like Vincent, Parasole, Ed and Qu, Peterkin went out plenty during the late '80s and early '90s to clubs like The Sound Factory, The Red Zone and The Tunnel, but you get the sense that in listening to Black Jazz Consortium that it's music borne out of hours of studio work. While Qu was dancing in the middle of the floor, Peterkin was busy studying what was making them dance. Peterkin is no slouch behind the decks, though. His mix in advance of the crew's appearance at Berlin's Tape club may be the set's best. "I'd definitely like to play more, but I know I'm a bit different than what is happening now. I'm not reinventing the wheel, though. I guess it's just because it's where I'm at, or where I'm starting from."

http://www.myspace.com/blackjazzconsortium




Quote:

This tagteam set from two of the rising stars of the New York house music community was recorded live at House-N-Home in Brooklyn on November 15, 2008. You can catch both Fred and QU at the next Bunker at Public Assembly on February 6. You can read more about them here and here.

The Bunker Podcast 44: Fred P and DJ Qu @ The Bunker (22.01.2009), 15.11.2009

Last edited by carramrod: 21-Aug-09 at 11:36pm

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DJ Qu


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DJ Qu is the dancer. Now known primarily as a DJ, Qu made his start in the dance music world through dancing. Traveling the world as a dancer for a variety of artists, and then going on to teach classes and workshops alongside his mentor Brian "Footwork" Green and friend Joey Anderson on house dancing, when Qu talks about tapping into the spirit of true house music, you can be sure he knows exactly what he's talking about. Over the past few years, Qu has largely given up dancing and instead focused his energies toward DJing, production and the House Dance Conference party, an event that was started by Green in 1999. It's a night for true heads, with people flying in from all over the world to visit.

"I had been wanting to DJ at their party for a while, because I consider myself the dancer's DJ," Ed laughed, when I asked him about how he met DJ Qu. It's a common sentiment for each of the UQ DJ's: Their music is embraced by connoisseurs of the genre, those who have either lived through house music's golden age, or those seeking to capture a little piece of what they imagine it must have been like. Qu's music is some of the most stripped down of the artists working in the New York house scene at the moment, carving out deep grooves that reflect his tendency to favor the dancer above all else. You can hear as much in his recent mixpart of the six-mix CD that the label is using to promote their upcoming night at Berlin's Tape clubwhose irresistible rhythms are perfect for fancy footwork.

Like Ed and Parasole, he also has a full-time job, which limits his time, but he's nonetheless been able to build his Strength Music imprint into a respected label based on the quality of what are largely his own productions. Qu has a shorter production resume than most. In fact, his Strength Music label hasn't issued a single released in 2009. He's spent the majority of the year focusing on remix work, and is set to relaunch the label in September with The Semesters Pt. 2, as well as a DJ Qu album which will likely hit stores sometime in 2010.

http://www.myspace.com/strengthmusic

Last edited by carramrod: 21-Aug-09 at 11:59pm

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I need to check that Parasole mix, that Solab track is the best track I've heard this year.

I definitely wouldn't call any of the tracks I know in these mixes 'NY House' though, which to me is garage like MAW etc. more like Detroit styles.

All good though.
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You're a fucking legend Carramrod, great thread.
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That the guy who wrote that article
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looks the good, will def have a read when i have the time
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Thanks carram, I'll definately be checking some of them out over the next week or two when I get a chance.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by DMPM

I definitely wouldn't call any of the tracks I know in these mixes 'NY House' though, which to me is garage like MAW etc. more like Detroit styles.

My initial reaction was to agree but then, after caning Levon's RA Podcast in the last few days, a few things really struck me. On reflection Parasole's ssg gave me the same feeling. The sound in the mixes is like the sound that Tenaglia was pushing throughout the 90s. I am not sure that the author of the article was thinking of Tenaglia when he wrote his piece but I see a direct link between what DT was doing and what the artists in this thread are doing.

Dont discount DT on the Techno and House fronts which I think many people have done because he got pigonholed with the progressive movement when he did GU releases for Athens and London. If you listen to the GUs they sound nothing like the rest of the GU series and have a very house and techno flavour. On the production front Hard and Soul fits the mould I am describing perfectly while Tourism is probably a little more tribal (which doesn't depart from this theme too much as tribal elements are certainly used). His latest release Futurism is purely techno, tech-house and house and has been largely ignored around these parts (unfortunately). Then there is the even more obvious fact that he is a proud New Yorker and possibly NY's biggest name.

NY is too large to break down to having the one sound. There is the Tenaglia merger of techno, garage (house) and tribal, the straight out tribal sounds of guys like Calderone and DT himself, and the garage of MAW as DMPM pointed out. On my high horse and talking shit (which I am) I would say that, above all else, NY DJs are about an attitude that you feel more than anything you specifically hear.

So I would have to disagree, it is very much a revival of NY house.

Last edited by carramrod: 23-Aug-09 at 01:14pm

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I haven't listened to any of this mixes, but I the only tracks I know are by Ibex, Mike Huckaby, Omar-S, Solab (yeah I know) etc. - not NY house and not anything like what DT plays.

Not out for a barney, just a (pointless) observation.
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I dont know i think alot of this stuff coming out of new york has a kind of Todd Terry toughness, definitely influenced by the D though... the rawness of it all.

Im liking it alot
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In terms of a New York house renaissance, is there anywhere for these guys to actually play in New York? It was my understanding that New York was rather dance un-friendly?

It may sound like a rather prosaic observation among this informed chatter, but it seems strange for a city to have a strong underground scene when there isn't anywhere to go to hear this music.
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I don't know about these guys, but I've heard nothing but great things about Francois K's Deep Space night that has been running for years.

A fried was there recently on a Tuesday night and seen Theo Parrish playing to a packed crowd.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by carramrod





RA Podcast 158 feat. Levon Vincent, 8.06.2009


I enjoyed that.
SOUNDCLOUD

MIXCLOUD
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Quote:

Originally Posted by boxcar_saviour

In terms of a New York house renaissance, is there anywhere for these guys to actually play in New York? It was my understanding that New York was rather dance un-friendly?

It may sound like a rather prosaic observation among this informed chatter, but it seems strange for a city to have a strong underground scene when there isn't anywhere to go to hear this music.

from what i understand NY is definitely on the up. parasole runs some cool loft parties, the bunker is techno central and there are a bunch of other parties going about, plus deepspace as DMPM mentioned.

dont know whether it is NY or detroit, but there is definitely a new constellation of sounds coming out of NY around these guys. one person i'd add to that list, who i think should have been included in the article, is eric cloutier. he hasn't started producing yet, but the man can spin. he's already done one ssg mix and he'll be doing another one later this year (as well as one from levon vincent).
http://mnmlssg.blogspot.com/
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Listened to the 5 hour set from Jus-Ed today (how do you pronounce his name, joo-said? juiced?) and I have to say, it's one of the best new sets I've heard lately. I'll definitely be grabbing a few more from this thread soon.
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Introducing: Levon Vincent

Bodytonic Interview

Quote:

There was a time in the early-to-mid 1990s that New York was the epicentre of house music, a culmination of 20 years of deviant dancing in a city that was according to Lou Reed - sinking like a rock. But it couldnt last as the city got cleaned up, the clubs disappeared, the labels folded, the record stores closed down. Some key names soldiered on, but the moment had more or less passed. The last 18 months have seen a flicker of something again a new DIY East Coast sound, headed by DJ QU, Jus Ed and Fred P. Only this time as Levon Vincent tells Bodytonic - almost no-one in New York is paying attention


How much of an influence has the sound of New York been?

When you live there, you dont realise how spoiled you are - to have such a fusion of cultures and to be able to pick and choose from such a wide array of influences is really great. It could be said that a common goal among artists these days would be to soften the difficulties that come with a frenzied globalisation. There are so many tools and experiences that the city has to offer in the way of advanced perspective.
But I am not in New York this year. I am living in Indiana right now. Solitude. I have been here for six months and I have only been home to New York a few times. Its this excursion which has allowed me to focus so heavily on music and to do all the releases this year. I have never been to the midwest before - I love it here. I love how quite it is. I can really concentrate and also, its nice how loud I can be, with no neighbours to complain.


Am I right in suggesting (seminal New York club) the Sound Factory has influenced some of the music you are making?

Hell Yeah. The Sound Factory was a huge influence on me. That era is really when I decided what to do with my life. My first experience DJing was at Sugar Babies on 3rd Ave and 5th Street in 1992. Those guys were really cool to me. I was really young and they all looked after me and gave me work, first washing dishes and then eventually I became busboy. Both Dmitri and Lady Kier from Dee-lite worked there as wait staff before their project blew up. I never met Kier during that time, but I did meet Dmitri a few times, we would smoke pot in the basement. There were great clubs in the early 90s: Tunnel, Limelight, Save The Robots, Nation, The Shelter, others too.
I worked at (designer) Pat Fields shop from 93-97. The walls were painted by Martine from Maxi records. You know the Running Back labels Sex Trax EP by Radioslave? That artwork is homage to Martine. I was active in the scene at that time, I DJed quite often at house parties and bars. You could say thats when I cut my teeth. I also worked with Paul Alexander, who lent his voice to many house records Step into a world, of your innermost desires. So deep, so liquid 51 Days sampled him for their big one (Paper Moon on Touche)There were many brilliant, influential people I met through that job.
I am a scientist working in the field of ass-shakery.


Is there anything to get inspired by in New York today? Musically or otherwise?

I am inspired by all my friends - DJ QU, Fred P, Jus- Ed, Anthony Parasole, a friend of mine EM, who will make his debut on the upcoming Novel Sound comp in the fall


When did you decide to start Novel Sound?

Jus-Ed really talked me into doing Novel Sound. I was basically finished with the business side of music - a little sour and happy just to be making exclusive tracks for my friends to play out, but lucky for me he convinced me to go further. He had been playing a track of mine, Deeper out a lot. It eventually became the basis of the first Novel Sound release. I feel that a lot of people probably gave Novel Sound #01 a chance because I included a track by Ed, Dont Answer The Phone. He has been a good friend to me and a great mentor to have in this business.


And Deconstruct Music?

I have a business partner for Deconstruct, my friend Anthony Parasole. Hes from Coney Island. He's also part of our UQ family. He does a party in New York called House n Home. It is widely known in NY as a guaranteed good time. I like that I also have a best friend who I trust and a second label going. Like they say, don't put all your eggs in one basket.
I made the music for the first two releases, but Anthony also makes beats and the third release will debut Anthony's music to the world, in the form of a remix collaboration between him and Fred P. The record is called Party People Clap They Hands by DJ QU. Ed and I also did a remix basically, the whole Underground Quality family. Its going to be four tracks, a double LP release.


What inspired the tougher sounds of your past few releases?

I think I have always had an aggressive sound - I have been told that before anyway - but I cant say that I have set out to have any sound in particular. Some music sounds like it comes from the heart - I think sometimes my sound comes from the gut instead. Maybe its a mistake actually, but a good one. As far as my work in 2009, I think I just finally got it right. I got some of the music out. I really hope that I can continue and survive because I truly love doing this.
The most difficult aspect, which probably holds a lot of us back as producers, is figuring out how to survive on little or no money. One thing that is tricky about the US is that you are not given healthcare as part of your citizenship - it is given instead through a full time job, meaning 40+ hours per week; leaving no time for music. You can buy health insurance privately, but you would have to be wealthy. Its a system that keeps people locked in their jobs. No conspiracy or anyone trying to hold you down, its just a plain fact of life. The way our system has been designed, it benefits people who perform standardised work duties, at full time working schedules. The whole patronage system and support structure for the arts has broken down in the past 100 years. Things can be tough. I have been going without healthcare for most of my life, and I have been turned away from hospital more than once when I was in need. I keep my fingers crossed that nothing serious happens and I keep working on music. One day I trust everything will work out and if not, well, fuck it, I have music.


You are getting a lot of love from places like Hardwax and the Berlin techno scene did you expect this?

No, I did not. I am truly honoured. Phonica and Dope Jams too. Actually the record stores have all been really good to me. I am so honoured. To know that Hardwax is supporting my efforts, it feels like I hit my mark. Those guys have been so cool Marcel, Achim, Etsuko, Michael, everyone over there. The Berghain crew too. All I can say is that I feel very honoured this year.
One day I trust everything will work out and if not, well, fuck it, I have music.
Theres a deeper side to you too - Im thinking of the the amazing 1000 Miles From Home, These Games
I was proud of that 1000 miles track when I made it. Its about hiding out in Indiana, getting all this music written. Its just a guess, but I imagine I am about 1000 miles from New York. As far as the split persona persona goes -I grew up on house music, like you mentioned - Sound Factory etc - but what we always thought was cool would be the DJ who dropped a Basic Channel record into their set, or when Power Music sampled (Basic Channels) Quadrant. I guess people always think there is something cooler going on somewhere else. Theres a romantic notion, one which every collector can probably relate to with their own search for cool vinyl: the back story; the narrative.
For us, you hear Eightball records all night and then one record which is slightly different stylistically, and that one is going to stand out. It will seem a little more exotic, like Berlin was to us at that time. Its hard to communicate this powerful aspect to record hunting now, because the internet has made regional sounds much less distinct And that is a good thing! Anyone can do any sound because we have equal exposure. This is not only with musical dialogs but also sexuality, religion, visual art with some negativity too: weaponry, slavery, hatred.but the dialogues are proof we are benefiting as a species as the world grows smaller.


When you DJ, what kind of music do you play?

House music, techno, a random weird one if I think it will fly. I really work to make the people move. I am a scientist working in the field of ass-shakery.


Do you play often in the US?

No, almost never. I dont try really either. I would love to, but considering that my records dont sell here, I doubt I would have much luck, ha ha ha! Except for New York of course. I do OK there and have played countless times over the years. Lots of empty rooms, but a few notable gigs too. I had a great gig this year: I played the House n Home party with Fred P and we killed it.


Is there much appreciation for what you, Jus-Ed, DJ QU etc are doing?

I think Europe likes us a lot, we have a strong presence there. I really would like to get some more music into the Japanese market, but its tough: I dont know how to yet.


How did you meet those guys?

We got to be friends 10 years ago, I worked at Halcyon in Brooklyn for several years. We would broadcast the Wednesday Underground Quality radio show from there. (Check it out Wednesdays here. I never let anyone work that night besides myself, Wednesdays was my shift, no matter what. The music was always the best, and that's the plain truth, the days were locked down. I was there for Ed's first CD release party. We used to talk about making music, technique and stuff. He played me demos of what would become the first few Underground Quality releases. I have known Fred and Qu for four to five years, seen them out at clubs, but I am really becoming friends with them now that we are working together. I have so much respect for those guys and their musicianship.


So is there something of a new East Coast sound with you guys?

Yes, I am not sure where we are headed - or if there is a name for the new style, but we can all sense that something special is happening with our crew right now and over the next few years. We are taking our house/deep house and trying to expand upon it. In the future I think people will give our movement a name etc I would be so lucky be part of something like that.


If so, this is a good thing, right? Strength in numbers?

Agreed. Strength in numbers.

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Vincent remixes Dehnert
Re: Mike Dehnert Umlaut 2 EP

A1 Umlaut2 (New Version)
A2 Umlaut2 (First Version)
B Umlaut2 (Levon Vincent's NY Basement Mix)


Two of the most inform DJs and producers in the world at the moment. While their styles as individuals are vastly different the combination of the two was intriguing. I like all of the tracks on the EP and particularly like Levon's remix (which is the reason it appears here).



Here is part of a review done for RA

Quote:

In the midst of a respectably prolific year, Tresor resident Mike Dehnert briefly steps away from his own Fachwerk label to kick off Clone's new Basement Series imprint. The EP features three variations on "Umlaut2," a potent, reduced wall-shaker that first appeared on a split with Roman Landau last year. Anyone who missed that tough, clean techno gem, or the MDRL EP that housed it, should take note of Clone's interest and do a little back-catalog research. Dehnert doesn't just have a signature style, he doggedly pursues a single sonic idea with the detail and care of a specialist. With that in mind, there's plenty to elevate this collection of alternate versions above the "supplemental text" category.

...

The EP's third track, then, is something of a jolt, with Novel Sound head Levon Vincent called in for remix honors. He slows the tempo, but basically retains the structure of Dehnert's track. Wild divergences in the sound palette, however, make all the difference. Vincent replaces Dehnert's bare-bones synths with an invigorating barrage of cheap horns, while percussive burps of what sound like treated vocals pop out of the arrangement whack-a-mole style. Gaudy, peculiar and irresistibly funky, it variously brings to mind Yello's "Oh Yeah," Eric B & Rakim's "To the Listeners" and DJ Koze's "Dr. Fuck." And if that doesn't pique your interest, I don't even know you anymore.

Last edited by carramrod: 02-Sep-09 at 09:53pm

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I strongly agree Mike Dehnert is on the money! Levon is a1 also
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"The central figure in the New York house renaissance"

Media hype IMO. NYC has been putting out the best house for years, if not forever.

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Good Doctor

"No, I'm not letting you use my headphones, just cause you've got a USB stick full of MP3's in your pocket".

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You are right in many respects.

What the guys in this thread and some others are doing is taking the sound into the Techno market in Europe with what seems to be significant success.

The sounds have become relevant against and the scribes are only just catching on so that is where the "renaissance" comes from.

Last edited by carramrod: 03-Sep-09 at 09:02pm

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hence many of theses artists find there music in a lot of techno dj's playlists
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Quote:

For many listeners, Fred P. was one of 2009s major discoveries. Less a young upstart than a veteran finally getting his due, Fred Peterkin has become one of the key players in New York Citys resurgent house scene. His affiliations with Jus-Ed and Move D both of whom are contributors to upcoming releases on Peterkins Soul People Music imprint hint at his elegant deep house style, but his releases for the past two years as Black Jazz Consortium have established his unique voice.

Fred took off from working on his ever-expanding label and his own productions not only for an in-depth discussion, but to provide us with our 29th podcast as well: an exclusive two hour journey through the deepest house including some unreleased cuts. (interview by Shuja Haider)

Quote:

How was this mix recorded?

Fred P.: I woke up out of a deep sleep and started mixing out of a pile of records Ive been playing out over the past few months. I used a Technics 1200 MK2, a Stanton S550 Dual CD Player, though only one player works, a Numark Pro CM-1000R Mixer Rotary, an old and beat down Pyle Pro PYX-3X Crossover, and a Roland VS840EX for effects only. Clips and blips are taken from the movies The Secret and Beat Street.

Youve put out tracks under both your own name and as Black Jazz Consortium. Is there a difference?

Yeah, to a certain degree. The stuff I do as Black Jazz Consortium is a bit more consistent, as opposed to Fred P where Im experimenting a little bit. If Im compiling or something like that, outside of me being creative, Ill probably just be Fred P. An exception would be the upcoming Earthtones collaboration on vinyl, which is myself, DJ Jus-Ed, and Move D. Thats probably the only compilation where Ill be Black Jazz Consortium.

How do you approach a collaboration like that? How did it come together?

Well, Ive been on Underground Quality on a few outings already, and I met Move D my first time in Germany. Basically, he knows my work and he likes my work, and I respect him a lot; I think hes a great artist. The music I did with Move D Ive had for a while, like a year. The original idea for the Earthones collaboration was to be a CD, but seeing whats going on with technology now, what goes on with CDs when they come out, I feel it would be better to respect the work put into it musically by doing it on vinyl.

Do you stick to vinyl as a DJ?

Yes. Id like to exclusively play with vinyl, though its kind of difficult. When I have some promotional stuff thats on a CD, or something deep in my collection thats on a CD, then whatever, but I like to play with vinyl. In a perfect world, it would be all vinyl.

Where did the name Black Jazz Consortium come from?

The name Black Jazz Consortium came from a project I did about 10 years ago. The original name of it was Brooklyn Jazz Consortium, because I was living in Brooklyn then Bed-Stuy, to be exact. I told a good friend of mine by the name of Jay Locke about it and he was like, Yeah, thats a cool name, but the project never went anywhere and it went into the closet for eons. 10 years later, I did a couple releases digitally, and I needed a name. I came across one of my CDs at the time that said Brooklyn Jazz Consortium, but I wasnt living in Brooklyn anymore and it wouldnt have made sense. So I just said, I need a quick name, and came up with Black Jazz Consortium. Slapped that on it, and off to the races. It seemed to catch on, and as time went by I started to define what that actually meant, and it took on a deeper meaning.

What is that deeper meaning?

I love jazz music, basically the idea of it, because its so closely related to dance music. If you really look at it through the history, jazz music at its inception was the dance music of its day. Now its really no different, its just electronic, and its more about artists themselves as opposed to a trio or quartet or whatever the case may be. But to me, its free-form music.

Name some jazz musicians who have inspired you.

Chick Corea, Groove Holmes, Oscar Peterson, Stanley Turrentine, Freddie Hubbard, Tom Scott theres a whole bunch of em actually.

Do you have any experience playing jazz, or any other kind of musical training?

Nah, I play by ear. If the vibe is good, and I can feel it, I might be able to scratch out a little something. Im not a traditional musician by any stretch of the imagination, so I couldnt tell you a note if you asked me. I play both black and white keys though, its not like I only play black keys!

How did you first get into making tracks?

I started making tracks when I was like, 15 years old. What happened was, I was into hip-hop back then, beatboxing, cutting and scratching, breakdancing you know, pseudo-b-boy stuff. Someone saw me rhyming with a friend from school and said, Hey, I wanna make a demo. I didnt know the first thing about that, but I saw it as an opportunity. So I pretended I had some knowledge of what that was about. That was my first opportunity to see a studio, and once I got in the door, forget about it. Its been on ever since. After that experience, I started to collect cassette decks, and tried to learn what multi-tracking was about. Even though the sound quality was terrible, it taught me the concept of sound design. Some of that stuff I still do in my tracks, with some of the weird noisier sounding things. Levels is a good example of that, you have the layered noises bouncing around within it as a rhythm. Thats a piece of that concept.

What inspired you to move from hip-hop to electronic music?

When I was in high school, I used to go to clubs to dance. I hung out in high school with a friend whose family members were actually in the scene and were able to get into clubs for free. It was always about dancing, I didnt really have anything to do with collecting records or wanting to DJ. I just loved to dance to the music. Thats how I got into house. It was definitely about the vibe, the energy, the whole nine. I did that from about 88 to about 90 three years worth of going to clubs and dancing, back before I even collected a record. Then when I stopped; I missed the music, so I would go to the record stores and buy the records.

So even though I got into hip-hop and was doing hip-hop production and all this stuff, behind the scenes I was still listening to house music. It never really left; it was what I would listen to when I didnt want to hear anything else. It was always there, and when I got my first studio set up, the first tracks I produced were house tracks. No one ever heard them, but I produced them. They came to me easier than hip-hop at the time. I actually had to learn to put a hip-hop track together, whereas a house track kind of came easily to me. Not to say its easy to do, but the idea, the form, was a bit easier to wrap my mind around. To make a long story short, when I stopped doing hip-hop I stopped creating music altogether for about two years. When I got back into it again, my good friend Jay Locke inspired me to get back into making electronic music.

Who were the key dance artists for you when you started collecting records?

In the very beginning it was like Todd Terry, Masters At Work, anything that was on Strictly Rhythm, Nervous, Right Area those were the main labels. That was in the early days. Fast forward, say to about 1999, 2000, it was basically Bugz in the Attic, 4Hero, IG Culture the whole West London crew. Theyre the ones who re-inspired me to really go hard and make some music, because they were using all the elements I liked from all electronic music, not just house or broken beat. They were utilizing everything and putting it into a danceable form, and thats what made me really want to make music again. So I was collecting that stuff from about 1999 to about 2003, and then I switched. I started getting into deeper house, like real deep house, which is where the association with Underground Quality comes from, because Ed has been producing just some of the deepest stuff from then until now. Hes still bringing out some bangers hes the man for that! Thats really what Im playing now, with little nuggets from other places, but its mainly Underground Quality, Strength Music, Novel Sound, Deconstruct. I mean, Im not shirking anybody, thats just whats going on right now!




Quote:

Has the scene in New York changed much since you got involved with it?

I have to be perfectly honest with you. Im a bit of a hermit. I mean, when I used to go out way back in the day, the scene was different. New York was different. We didnt have all the restrictions weve got now. Back in like, 87, you could really party in New York from sunup to sundown and it really wouldnt be any problem. Now the club scene is so constricted, its crazy. Its difficult for underground guys to really get something started in the clubs because theres so much on the back end you have to worry about, monetarily and logistically. So you dont get to see much about that anymore. Especially since 9/11, it changed the scene a lot, because of the laws and all that different stuff.

Today, to be real with you, I only come out to parties where I know Im going to hear what I like to hear. But now music is being presented in different forms. For instance, House-n-Home is done in a loft as opposed to a club, which is genius because it takes the club aesthetic out and leaves the house party in. That place is incredible and every party Ive attended has been a stellar event. Thats my reason for going out. Otherwise I might step out here or there but Im not really out in the scene like that because that energy I like about the scene isnt really there. I mean, dont get me wrong, everybodys doing stuff. I could talk about it more on a musical tip than about the scene. Musically, theres a definite shift going on because really, this kind of stuff might have been there but it hasnt been put on the forefront. All credit goes to DJ Jus-Ed for putting it on the forefront. For instance, that Unity Kolabo Ed set up, if you listen to that, everyone on it is absolutely amazing! And Im not saying that because Im on it. I havent seen a record like that in years. Musically, theres definitely a paradigm shift happening in dance music in New York.

Do you get to play in town much? Where do most of your gigs happen?

Whats funny is that my first major gig was overseas. I played at Hafen 2 in Offenbach and Cube in Heidelberg a year ago or so, and those were the first major clubs Ive ever played in. I couldnt get arrested here, actually. Then I went back for an Underground Quality night in Berlin with DJ Jus-Ed and DJ Qu, and then when I came home I started to get more gigs. So I was gigging about every month for like six months or so. Which was cool, because I wasnt exactly used to it. Im more of a production guy. Ninety percent of the time Im in the studio, and its different world getting out and performing with records. Im still actually getting a feel for it.

Is music a full-time thing for you?

Yes it is. It is doesnt pay as much as commercial music, not remotely. Its only because of the economy, I mean jobs are tight now. But I definitely need another hustle to go along with this, because Im truly independent, man. I gotta work it for what I can.

Soul People Music has focused on putting out your own productions. Do you plan on adding other artists in the future?

Soul People in the very beginning was digital, and there was a whole roster. There were eight or nine releases. Then we lost our digital distribution, which happens if you dont release something like, every week, to keep up with quotas. Then I started producing vinyl, which is a difficult medium to build on since the record stores started closing. So Ive been putting all my effort into the Black Jazz Consortium project, to build it up so I can start presenting other artists on vinyl. That way its not so much a roll of the dice. Im starting to do it with the Earthtones project. Maybe three or four records into that series I can start bringing out some artists who I already have on the roster who have gotten released digitally. Youll start to see more artists digitally, but in the future youll see them on vinyl as well.

How has digital technology affected what you do, not only terms of distribution but production as well?

The only piece of computer software I use is Cubase, and I use it for recording purposes only. Im old school when it comes to making music. I need the equipment right in front of me. I need knobs. I need to be able to turn things on and off with my fingers, instead of a mouse. I need to slide things. So I use a keyboard, I use a sampler, and I use a board to make my thing happen. Nothing against digital studios, at some point I will have to get with the technology of the day and try it out. But what I know is analog, and thats how I get down. The only problem I have with digital music is that if you have a lot of artists using the same program, most of the time a lot of their music tends to have the same feeling. You get a lot of the same sounds, so they basically all sound like the same song! With time, you can freak anything and make it a little bit different, but for me, I live in an analog world. Theres more feeling to it, and you can hear everything, right or wrong. Whereas with digital, its so clean. Theres no room for anything else! Thats cool too, and I do have some of that music. I dont hate on it at all. But I like the analog environment.

Does having those knobs and sliders affect how you produce tracks? How does your creative process work?

I dont know, man. Thats a touchy subject! I dont particularly have a theory for making music. Maybe that is my theory.

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LittleWhiteEarbuds Podcast 029: Black Jazz Consortium (Fred P), 7.09.2009

Quote:

Tracklist:

01. Patrice Scott, Excursions (Reprise) [Sistrum Recordings]
02. Leonid, Never Mind, Use The Moon [CDR]
03. Black Jazz Consortium, Steps Beyond [Soul People Music]
04. Ernie, Soul Of The Night (Ordell remix) [Minuendo Recordings]
05. Rick Wade, The D [Laid]
06. Imugem Orihasam, Weather Report [CDR]
07. Brawther, Endless (Deep Mix) [Balance Alliance]
08. Deymare, (unknown) [CDR]
09. Chaton & Ripperton, **** Ahead 2″ (Rippertons Los Barrios Mix)
[Plak Records]
10. DJ Spider & Lola, Haarp Storm (Spiders Alternate Mix) [Plan B Recordings]
11. Substance, Relish Loops 1-6″ [Chain Reaction]
12. Joey Anderson, Untitled [CDR]
13. DJ Qu, The Zones [Strength Music]
14. DJ Jus-Ed, Getty Up [CDR]
15. Levon Vincent, The Medium Is the Message [Novel Sound]
16. Damon Bell, Banyana [Deepblak]
17. Fred P., Open (Mars Mix) [Soul People Music]
18. Move D, Drne [Modern Love]
19. DJ Jus-Ed, Step Up 2″ [Underground Quality]
20. Black Jazz Consortium, The Om [Soul People Music]
21. Levon Vincent, Invisible Bitch Slap [Deconstruct Music]
22. George & Andre Hommen, Marashi [Objektivity]
23. Leonid, Sadim [Sistrum Recordings]
24. Sterac, Rond [Delsin Records]
25. DJ Qu, Somethin Ta Feel [Strength Music]
26. Fred P., Untitled [CDR]
27. Dub Poets, Black + White [white]
28. Hayden Andre presents Subculture, The Voyage [Strobe Records]

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Given that the Renaissance is connected to The Bunker there are a few names that we can add to the list of DJs and Producers to keep an eye on. It was not my attention to (and I don't think anything can be gained by) limiting the scope of this thread to the artists originally listed.

I doubt that Derek Plaslaiko needs any introduction. The quality of his DJ sets seems to be fairly common knowledge. The acid trip in The Bunker Podcast totally captivated me, highlighting the need to create a place to come and appreciate Plaslaiko in the ITM techno thread.


Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/plaslaiko


To get things started, I'll turn to the trusty old RA Podcast.



RA092 feat Derek Plaslaiko, 25.02.2008

Quote:

Tracklist:

01. Adultnapper Tewa (Beat Pharmacy RMX) Ransom Note Footnote
02. Joel Mull Coconest Truesoul
03. Far East Band The Call Up (Martin Buttrich Rework) Four Music
04. Alland Byallo Haunted Heart unsigned
05. Takuya Morita Woman and Shadow Adjunct
06. Kyle Geiger Get Up Drumcode
07. Kage Youre Glue D Records
08. Agaric Goosestep Raummusik
09. Par Grindvik Akustik Stockholm LTD
10. Friendly People Music Is Improper (Martin Buttrich RMX) Apnea
11. Martin Landsky Man High Poker Flat
12. Einzelkind Spam Bot (Tomba Special Tiefschwarzturntablerocker Edit) Playhouse
13. Deadset Buzzer Says Werner (Deadset Play Live) Front Room
14. Catz n Dogz A Chicken Affair Dirtybird
15. Matt John Olga Dancekowski (Audions Paradise Cafe Mix) BAR25
16. John Tejada Labyrinth Palette
17. Polder Shandy 100% Pure
18. Oliver $ Hot Flash Made To Play




Quote:

for the 4th installment in the projektion series, we bring you an exclusive mix from new york's one and only derek plaslaiko. in true form, derek takes us on a two hour journey through techno, the way only he can, with healthy doses of headiness and jackin beats throughout that capture your mind and move your body.

Projektion Podcast 004: Derek Plaslaiko, 8.05.2009




Quote:

This set was recorded live at The Bunker in Brooklyn on September 4, 2009. This set captures Derek opening The Bunker back room from 10pm to 12am (before Hrdvsion, Octave One, and Surgeon), which is not his normal slot, but one he obviously excels at. You can read more about him here.

The Bunker Podcast 59: Derek Plaslaiko @ The Bunker (30.09.2009), 1.10.2009

Last edited by carramrod: 13-Oct-09 at 12:55am

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As Chris suggested above Eric Cloutier should also be an inclusion amongst New York's elite..

His ssgs effort below is excellent, anyone interested should also keep an eye out for a new ssgs mix that he is doing (some sort of post Labyrinth special


Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/elementeight


mnml ssgs mx22: Eric Cloutier, Thursday, March 19, 2009



Quote:

Tracklist:

00. potuznik - the traveler turned around [cheap records]
01. audion - i am the car [unknown]
02. dub taylor - human shades #18 [opossum recordings]
03. gonno - i don't need competition [beyond]
04. pepe bradock - deep burnt [kif recordings]
05. seth troxler - aphrika [wolf+lamb records]
06. derek marin - bright lights, dark room (osborn remix) [subtrak]
07. omar-s - psychotic photosynthesis [fxhe records]
08. pied plat - double trouble [rush hour]
09. mathias mayer + patlac - skipper [liebe*detail]
10. pan-pot - ape shall never kill ape (cassy remix) [mobilee]
11. steve bug + richie hawtin - low blow [m_nus]
12. the vision - detroit: one circle [metroplex]
13. scott grooves - atmospheric emotions [natural midi]
14. levon vincent - these games [novel sounds]
15. jeremy - #10 b1 [driftwood]




Quote:

the projektion podcast series expands with 007 coming from one of the most essential players of NYC's famed 'the bunker'... eric cloutier. this near 3 hour exclusive set comes to us in prime cloutier fashion hitting every note in all things deep, sexy, heady, and dubby. as one of america's most notable players in minimal techno and house this installment is a must-have for any head's collection.

Projektion Podcast 007: Eric Cloutier, 31.08.2009

Last edited by carramrod: 13-Oct-09 at 01:03am

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some cool techhouse there

but...

cant they just say they are making techhouse???
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Missed the BJC lwe 029 podcast earlier, thanks mate.
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for me i've always considered sean cusick and dj three as new york djs who have managed to span techno, house and breaks/dub better than other djs i've heard.

three i've had the pleasure of seeing (cusick dissapeared before i could).

the thing with them is its not techno by any definition.....and its not house.....it has some roots in both...at times sounding a bit like the tyrant sound from early 2000s.

check it out imo. jimmy van m also had some stuff similar but tended toward the deeper progressive sound mostly.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Pham

I'd pay $100 just to see Move D cook some spring rolls.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by JazzyJimmyJ


its not techno by any definition.....and its not house.....it has some roots in both...



this to me is exactly what techhouse is, has been for 6 years now... its never been about one particular sound ie german etc



its like rocknroll


a meeting of two sounds that explores both ends of the spectrum and everything in between
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three moogcast, live in san francisco 14.2.2009: http://www.atnarko.com/moogcast020.mp3
http://mnmlssg.blogspot.com/
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cheers chris.

he doesn't seem to have a lot of sets pop up.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Pham

I'd pay $100 just to see Move D cook some spring rolls.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by carramrod

LittleWhiteEarbuds Podcast 029: Black Jazz Consortium (Fred P), 7.09.2009

This is the serious business.
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I think this rounds out the main Bunker Residents:

Quote:

DJ Spinoza is Bryan Kasenic, the man behind Brooklyn’s legendary The Bunker club nights, co-presenter of “Detroit Mutations” at Unsound Krakow on 23.10.2009. The two organizations will also work together in New York at the start of February, to co-present a series of club nights in the context of Unsound Festival New York.
To celebrate this connection, DJ Spinoza has created an Unsound Podcast that gives an intro into the world of The Bunker. The mix was made in Brooklyn, with Traktor Scratch and two turntables.

UP # 4 Spinoza's intro to the sound of the Bunker, 6.10.2009

Quote:

Tracklist:

01. Leonel Castillo "El Nio" (Greener)
02. DS "Orangefood (Jens Zimmermann's Vitamin C)" (Snork Enterprises)
03. The Mole "For The Lost" (Internasjonal)
04. DXR "Fader Pushing Sunday" (Klakson)
05. Peter Van Hoesen "Realtime Proof" (Morse)
06. Mark Broom "Runners" (D1 Recordings)
07. Paulo Olarte "Centauro" (Diynamic Music)
08. October "Invitation" (Caravan Recordings)
09. Rework "Love Love Love Yeah (Chlo Remix)" (Playhouse)
10. DJ Koze "Mrs. Bojangels" (Circus Company)
11. Ican "Caminos Del Nino (Martyn's Oscuro Remix)" (Ican Productions)
12. Chaton "**** Ahead Session 1" (Plak Records)
13. Red Snapper "Moving Mountain (Scuba Remix)" (Lo Recordings)
14. STP "The Fal (Peverelist Remix)" (Subsolo Records)

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Jus-Ed is making the trip down under

Dates:

Quote:

Friday 05 March 2010 @ Sorry Grandma, Melbourne

Saturday 06 March @ Mad Racket, Sydeny

Ed will be something special.

Last edited by carramrod: 11-Feb-10 at 08:56pm

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tru-fax

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Pham

I'd pay $100 just to see Move D cook some spring rolls.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by PSD4

Listened to the 5 hour set from Jus-Ed today (how do you pronounce his name, joo-said? juiced?) and I have to say, it's one of the best new sets I've heard lately. I'll definitely be grabbing a few more from this thread soon.

hehe. Maybe like 'Just Ed' but without the T. Like Trus Me
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will levon vincent be coming any time soon?
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Quote:

Originally Posted by boxcar_saviour

In terms of a New York house renaissance, is there anywhere for these guys to actually play in New York? It was my understanding that New York was rather dance un-friendly?

It may sound like a rather prosaic observation among this informed chatter, but it seems strange for a city to have a strong underground scene when there isn't anywhere to go to hear this music.


I'm with you. I was there a few months back and could not find anywhere to listen to cutting edge house/techno etc whatever. I slept through the Monday night Deep Space night at Cielo (I know, devo'd) after a long and arduous trip from London, and everywhere I asked (record stores etc) the response was the same. NYC has no club culture. There's nowhere to go out. It's all just small bars with small systems. People did not seem energised about this so-called 'rebirth' of the scene. A few (very well-known) native New-Yorker Djs and producers have said much the same thing over the last few months.

Anyway, not dissing NYC (the greatest city on the planet), just my own observation/experience.

And hooray for UQ, a freaking fantastic label which deserves all the good press it gets

Can't wait to see Jus Ed @ Mad Racket. Perfect party for him.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by carramrod

Jus-Ed is making the trip down under

Dates:



Ed will be something special.

Holy shit, just seen this!
Dollar. Dollar. Bills. Y'all.
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Just posting a to this thread. Some great sets, articles etc everywhere.

OnL - Weathering Shifts


Quote:

Originally Posted by ianwil1976 View Post

I can't bring myself to even click on the Hidden stuff, man. I'm sorry. I think he makes the musical equivalent of the feeling you'd have after coming down from a 72 hour ice binge and finding you've skull fucked your grandmother to death.

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Another artist I think worth mentioning is Terre Thaemlitz aka Dj Sprinkles.

Not currently living in NYC but a definite link to it. Is producing some really great music and has been for a long while now.

http://www.comatonse.com/thaemlitz/

link to a mix (really worth a listen): http://www.residentadvisor.net/forum-read.aspx?id=91453


Also, has anyone had a read from a while back of Daniel Wang's view on NYC??? There is a thread on djhistory forum. It's interesting....
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Excellent. Just keep adding the names.

I like being able to find common gound and put it in a general thread.

Better than having 10 threads with 2 or 3 responses.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by carramrod

My initial reaction was to agree but then, after caning Levon's RA Podcast in the last few days, a few things really struck me. On reflection Parasole's ssg gave me the same feeling. The sound in the mixes is like the sound that Tenaglia was pushing throughout the 90s. I am not sure that the author of the article was thinking of Tenaglia when he wrote his piece but I see a direct link between what DT was doing and what the artists in this thread are doing.

Dont discount DT on the Techno and House fronts which I think many people have done because he got pigonholed with the progressive movement when he did GU releases for Athens and London. If you listen to the GUs they sound nothing like the rest of the GU series and have a very house and techno flavour. On the production front Hard and Soul fits the mould I am describing perfectly while Tourism is probably a little more tribal (which doesn't depart from this theme too much as tribal elements are certainly used). His latest release Futurism is purely techno, tech-house and house and has been largely ignored around these parts (unfortunately). Then there is the even more obvious fact that he is a proud New Yorker and possibly NY's biggest name.

NY is too large to break down to having the one sound. There is the Tenaglia merger of techno, garage (house) and tribal, the straight out tribal sounds of guys like Calderone and DT himself, and the garage of MAW as DMPM pointed out. On my high horse and talking shit (which I am) I would say that, above all else, NY DJs are about an attitude that you feel more than anything you specifically hear.

So I would have to disagree, it is very much a revival of NY house.

The Tenaglia influence is undeniable. Great thread mate. Good read.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by muse

hehe. Maybe like 'Just Ed' but without the T. Like Trus Me

Never even occurred to me - just checked, and his name is Ed, so that would make sense
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Sunday best were putting some good parties on. Plus w+l parties and deep space!
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