Feed Me: "What happened to mystery in music?"

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Given the amount of misspelt, poorly thought-out and often pretty pointless Twitter soapboxing from the musically-inclined, it can be pretty refreshing when an artist takes the time to publish an insightful and thought-provoking musing on electronic music. Today, British producer Feed Me (also known under the moniker Spor) did just that, taking to his Facebook to (very eloquently) vent about the industry and share how much making music means to him.

Because it wouldn’t do the post justice to only pick out a few lines, here’s the full thing straight from Feed Me’s Facebook page – food for thought indeed.

“I’ve almost stopped doing interviews because I’m achieving nothing. If you want to find something out about me, ask me personally. If it catches my eye, I’ll respond, but dragging through another interview that no one thought about for more than two minutes seems like treading very boring water. Not that they’ve all been that way; but it’s the trend.

A well known electronic music magazine recently wanted to do a few page spread about my production techniques. They sent me a list of preliminary questions; what plugins do I use for ‘dirty’ sounds, what makes a good ‘drop’, how much ‘filth is too much filth’? Who wrote this? I could play the system; give away minimal information in exchange for some printed coverage, but at this point, fuck it. The Mau5hax thing was great; I got to interface with talented people and enjoy making music. I learnt as well as got involved. I didn’t sit and have my mechanical techniques picked at while my actual motivation was ignored; we made decisions together.

I don’t mind the occasional production Q, but what happened to mystery in music and art? There’s YouTube tutorials for days now online. Look it up; these production conversations are redundant. The truth and effect comes in the sincerity and composition of the actual piece. If I read an interview with an artist of any type, what I want to know is the ‘why’ – not the ‘how’. Why as electronic artists are we constricted to being quizzed monotonously about our techniques, and not ever our motivation? The reason anything I made sounds the way it did is because I sat and worked out every single piece of it myself. Give every one of us the same tools, and see what we all end up with – it’s our differences in expression and decision making that makes us.

I’m doing this because I honestly don’t know what else I can do. Music and art for me is a necessary release, and once people picked up on what I was making I was thrown into it. I was a bottled up, angry teenager, and I was completely consumed by the satisfaction I’d found in this new idea of making my own music. It consumed my life and I found I loved what it brought to it, and now I’m on an endless journey to see where it takes me, and where I can take it. Because of it, my entire late teenage and adult life I’ve been travelling the world, from Spor to Feed Me, constantly humbled by the people I’ve met, things I’ve seen, extremes I’ve lived through – I’m nothing but overwhelmingly grateful, it’s almost too much.

Some of it has been physically and mentally tough, but so far I’ve never quit. It’s never left my mind that should I drop dead, there’s a million people who would kill to take my place. I don’t believe in luck necessarily; I carved this out myself, but I am honoured to have what I have. If you’re going to complain about your reality when you’re living another persons dream, then I think you need a massive reality check. No one’s forcing you. Music is magic; and I think as artists we have a duty to keep it that way, not dissolve it down into presets, complaints, one-upmanship and catering to the market. It’s not all pink candy-floss cloud rides, and I think it looks fake if you depict it that way, but it really could be a lot fucking worse.

I used to lie and listen to my favourite records and daydream about how they were thought up, get lost in the sounds. There was no one to ask or study, and the resulting domino effect of speculation led me to my own ideas. It’s always been the unknown that’s motivated me. Spor was what I fell in to, but Feed Me is my world, a projection of a piece of me, and a way of expressing whatever I feel like. I couldn’t have built what I have without you guys supporting me, but I’ll always be creating and writing it none the less. I love you all for letting me take it this far.

I don’t normally post my opinions on here, but I’ve never got anywhere by playing the game, and sometimes I just feel I need to 1) say thanks, and 2) say why.”

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Comments

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angy

angy said on the 18th Apr, 2012

He used to be the Rogue Element yeah?

Saliki

Saliki said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I indeed listened to "Those who do not" by Surgeon and thought "Wha?!? Why?!? How the fuck did he make this?!? THIS. IS. AMAZING." and then I jizzed in my pants.

SlicyDicer

SlicyDicer said on the 18th Apr, 2012

"It%u2019s always been the unknown that%u2019s motivated me"

so absolutely true.

angy

angy said on the 18th Apr, 2012

To play the devil's advocate - your average listener doesn't really get into the details of the production anyway (I know for me personally the mystery is still there), it's only for the production enthusiasts. Ripping off another producer's style won't lead to anything original, but sometimes gaining knowledge of these techniques can lead them to their own sonic innovations. The standards are so high, and everyone has to start somewhere...

daveyjaye

daveyjaye said on the 18th Apr, 2012

lol ratty, that was my first thought too

WilhelmScream

WilhelmScream said on the 19th Apr, 2012

I'm not trying to hate on the guy, he seems to know what he's talking about and is passionate about it. But his music does not reflect what he is saying at all